Physicians of ancient Greece treated diseases, including epilepsy, by altering their patients' diet. An early treatise in the Hippocratic Corpus, On the Sacred Disease, covers the disease; it dates from c. 400 BC. Its author argued against the prevailing view that epilepsy was supernatural in origin and cure, and proposed that dietary therapy had a rational and physical basis.[Note 3] In the same collection, the author of Epidemics describes the case of a man whose epilepsy is cured as quickly as it had appeared, through complete abstinence of food and drink.[Note 4] The royal physician Erasistratus declared, "One inclining to epilepsy should be made to fast without mercy and be put on short rations."[Note 5] Galen believed an "attenuating diet"[Note 6] might afford a cure in mild cases and be helpful in others.[11]

I've been drinking Green tea for a while now, my girlfriend got me into it, but recently she found this awesome Red Tea advertisement online which has even more health benefits than most tea's out there. She ordered a box online and we honestly couldn't wait to try it out. The first thing we noticed was the amazing aroma it gave off when hot water was poured into our tea cups, I had a sip and was immediately blown away by the amazing flavor! Halfway through finishing my first cup I started feeling an unusual boost of energy all of a sudden and immediately used that energy to have an intense workout session! This Tea is so underrated I thought! Its been a few weeks now and honestly I cannot start my day without having a cup of this amazing Tea in the morning. Try it out and let me know what you think, I'm pretty sure you'll see noticeable results within days if you have at least 3 cups a day and continue using it for a month... Here it is! https://bit.ly/2SonhvZ

The problem is that many more women want to take phentermine than should technically be on it—and doctors are giving it to them, says Melina Jampolis, MD, an internist and recent past president of the National Board of Physician Nutrition Specialists. Brittany's physician prescribed it to her despite the fact that she didn't medically need it. "A lot of doc-in-the-box clinics"—sometimes called weight-loss clinics—"will provide it to anyone who will pay money,” says Dr. Jampolis. (The pills usually run $10 to $20 a month, earning them the nickname "cheap speed"; some insurance plans will cover phen).


Slimming tea: Does it work and is it bad for you? Slimming teas have become increasingly popular in recent years. They aim to suppress the appetite, reduce fat, or boost the metabolism. However, while weight loss may result, this is largely due to fluid loss. The use of these teas remains controversial, and people are encouraged to use other methods of weight loss. Read now
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