There are a few reasons you might hear sleep experts tell you to have a cup of this weight-loss tea before bed. For one, chamomile can make for an especially soothing part of your wind-down time, which cues your brain and body that you’re ready for sleep. Two, the herbal is caffeine-free, so it won’t keep you up. And three, chamomile has particular medicinal qualities from flavonoids called apigenin that calm nervous system activity to help you drift off without worry. Considering that a full night’s sleep promotes a healthy weight, this is one good-for-your waistline habit you should get behind. (Check out these tips to lose weight while you sleep.)


Rebecca Scritchfield, RDN, a registered dietician nutritionist who runs a body-positive anti-dieting nutrition group in Washington D.C., says there's a real stigma around admitting you want to lose weight nowadays, let alone are doing it with diet pills. This has driven phen users underground, to a network of online health and fitness message boards where they can anonymously share doctor recommendations and compare doses with their "phrend friends."
Despite continuous advances in the medical world, obesity continues to remain a major worldwide health hazard with adult mortality as high as 2.8 million per year. The majority of chronic diseases like diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease are largely related to obesity which is usually a product of unhealthy lifestyle and poor dietary habits. Appropriately tailored diet regimens for weight reduction can help manage the obesity epidemic to some extent. One diet regimen that has proven to be very effective for rapid weight loss is a very-low-carbohydrate and high-fat ketogenic diet.[1][2][3]

Recently, many of my patients have been asking about a ketogenic diet. Is a ketogenic diet safe? Would you recommend it? Despite the recent hype, a ketogenic diet is not something new. In medicine, we have been using it for almost 100 years to treat drug-resistant epilepsy, especially in children. In the 1970s, Dr. Atkins popularized his very-low-carbohydrate diet for weight loss that began with a very strict two-week ketogenic phase. Over the years, other fad diets incorporated a similar approach for weight loss.
“Individuals vary in their blood ketone levels (i.e., beta-hydroxybutyrate – aka BOHB) over the course of a day and from day to day. This can be due to variations in dietary carbohydrate and protein from meal to meal and from day to day…Additional factors that increase blood BOHB are endurance exercise and also after consuming fats containing medium chain triglycerides (MCT) such as butter, coconut oil, or purified MCT oil. In contrast, there is often a steep drop in BOHB after high intensity exercise, the mechanism for which has yet to be proven. This post-sprint drop in BOHB tends to be temporary (lasting for an hour or two), which means that it’s cause is very different from the days-long drop in blood BOHB that one sees after a large carb meal.”
Experts are concerned that, in some cases, the side effects of prescription medications to treat overweight and obesity may outweigh the benefits. For this reason, you should never take a weight-loss medication only to improve the way you look. In the past, some weight-loss medications were linked to serious health problems. For example, the FDA recalled fenfluramine and dexfenfluramine (part of the “fen-phen” combination) in 1997 because of concerns related to heart valve problems.
In the mid-1990s, Hollywood producer Jim Abrahams, whose son's severe epilepsy was effectively controlled by the diet, created the Charlie Foundation to promote it. Publicity included an appearance on NBC's Dateline programme and ...First Do No Harm (1997), a made-for-television film starring Meryl Streep. The foundation sponsored a multicentre research study, the results of which—announced in 1996—marked the beginning of renewed scientific interest in the diet.[1]

Some anti-obesity drugs can have severe, even, lethal side effects, fen-phen being a famous example. Fen-phen was reported through the FDA to cause abnormal echocardiograms, heart valve problems, and rare valvular diseases.[62] One of, if not the first, to sound alarms was Sir Arthur MacNalty, Chief Medical Officer (United Kingdom). As early as the 1930s, he warned against the use of dinitrophenol as an anti-obesity medication and the injudicious and/or medically unsupervised use of thyroid hormone to achieve weight reduction.[63][64] The side effects are often associated with the medication's mechanism of action. In general, stimulants carry a risk of high blood pressure, faster heart rate, palpitations, closed-angle glaucoma, drug addiction, restlessness, agitation, and insomnia.
In another study that involved mice with brain tumors, administration of 65 to 75 percent of the recommended daily calories helped reduce tumor growth by 35 and 65 percent among two different test groups. Total carb consumption was restricted to 30 grams only.14 A different mice study strictly limited carb consumption to 0.2 percent only, which helped reduce the growth of glucose-fermenting tumors.15

Apps have become a mainstream part of living more healthfully. Just think about it: There are apps built in to smart phones that help you track activity levels (perhaps prompting you to move a bit more), apps designed to help you track what you eat, apps to guide you through workouts and meditations, and more. While there are a sea of apps to help you put healthier habits in place, Noom, which touts itself as “the last weight loss program you’ll ever need” is getting considerable attention. Case in point: Noom was one of the top-searched diet terms on Google in 2018.

Something that makes the keto diet different from other low-carb diets is that it does not “protein-load.” Protein is not as big a part of the keto diet as fat is. Reason being: In small amounts, the body can change protein to glucose, which means if you eat too much of it, especially while in the beginning stages, it will slow down your body’s transition into ketosis.
Another important thing to remember: Even if a detox tea is made with only herbal ingredients, that doesn’t automatically mean it's harmless. “Even natural ingredients can have significant side effects,” Stefanski warns. For instance, many of the teas contain caffeine in the form of stimulants like yerba mate or guarana. Both are considered safe in small amounts, but getting too much caffeine can cause headaches, dizziness, anxiety, and even abnormal heart rhythms, says the National Institutes of Health.
In essence, it is a diet that causes the body to release ketones into the bloodstream. Most cells prefer to use blood sugar, which comes from carbohydrates, as the body’s main source of energy. In the absence of circulating blood sugar from food, we start breaking down stored fat into molecules called ketone bodies (the process is called ketosis). Once you reach ketosis, most cells will use ketone bodies to generate energy until we start eating carbohydrates again. The shift, from using circulating glucose to breaking down stored fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to four days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. Keep in mind that this is a highly individualized process, and some people need a more restricted diet to start producing enough ketones.

Side effects: Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, low blood pressure, and increased appetite. Serious side effects can include raised heart rate, pancreatitis, gallbladder disease, kidney problems, and suicidal thoughts. Liraglutide has been shown in studies to cause thyroid tumors in animals, but it is not yet known if it can cause thyroid cancer in humans.
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