Physicians of ancient Greece treated diseases, including epilepsy, by altering their patients' diet. An early treatise in the Hippocratic Corpus, On the Sacred Disease, covers the disease; it dates from c. 400 BC. Its author argued against the prevailing view that epilepsy was supernatural in origin and cure, and proposed that dietary therapy had a rational and physical basis.[Note 3] In the same collection, the author of Epidemics describes the case of a man whose epilepsy is cured as quickly as it had appeared, through complete abstinence of food and drink.[Note 4] The royal physician Erasistratus declared, "One inclining to epilepsy should be made to fast without mercy and be put on short rations."[Note 5] Galen believed an "attenuating diet"[Note 6] might afford a cure in mild cases and be helpful in others.[11]
Agreatdietplan, IOU812, or FarmerJames (the game you play all day rather than exercise), you have been banned from every other webpage. Why are you so desperate for attention? Too sick from eating all those bags of chips ma bought for you to get a job? No one is going to hire you because you are clearly mentally ill. You’re a great arguement for why abortion should stay legal. Too bad your mom didn’t have the money to prevent her last final disaster… YOU.
Onakpoya, I., Posadzki, P., & Ernst, E. (2014, February 17). The efficacy of glucomannan supplementation in overweight and obesity: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. [Abstract]. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 33(1), 70–78. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07315724.2014.870013
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