Many athletes would not consider following a ketogenic diets due to the limited evidence of a performance enhancing effect, the risk of side effects having a negative impact on performance and the difficulty in maintaining the lifestyle changes required to stay in ketosis. Exogenous ketones offer a method to deliver some of the benefits of ketone metabolism without requiring athletes to follow a strict ketogenic diet. Taking exogenous ketones creates a metabolic state that would not normally occur naturally: the state of having full carbohydrate stores as well as elevated ketones.

Adiponectin increases AMPK activity in skeletal muscle [188, 189] and the liver [189] by promoting Thr172 phosphorylation, likely in response to an increase in the AMP to ATP ratio [189]. Similarly, α-adrenergic signaling increases AMPK activity in skeletal [190] and cardiac muscle [191], and β-adrenergic signaling increases AMPK activity in adipose [192, 193], all through promotion of Thr172 phosphorylation. While activation through β-adrenergic signaling appears to involve the AMP to ATP ratio [192], α-adrenergic signaling appears to work independently of AMP and ATP [190]. Increases in adiponectin have been observed during ketogenic or low-carbohydrate diets, although primarily in obese individuals [194–196]. BHB induces adiponectin secretion in adipocytes [197], indicating that the level of nutritional ketosis may be an important determinant of the extent to which ketogenic diets influence AMPK activity through adiponectin. In regard to catecholamines, epinephrine increases during fasting, and this appears to be dependent on carbohydrate restriction [198], implying that epinephrine is likely to be elevated during nutritional ketosis. Consistent with this, dietary carbohydrate restriction increases catecholamines at rest [155, 199] and in response to exercise [155, 199–202]. This may be, at least in part, a result of glycogen depletion [200, 203], suggesting both direct and indirect effects of glycogen on AMPK activity. The potential for nutritional ketosis to increase catecholamines is further supported by the dependency of the antiseizure effects of ketogenic diets on norepinephrine [204].
You’ve got a few options here. Erythritol (Lakanto is awesome here), Xylitol (non-corn though to avoid tummy troubles!) and allulose are my top choices (no aftertaste at all!). Pyure is also a good one for muffins and quick breads, particularly if you’re trying to limit your sugar alcohol consumption (it’s added stevia makes it twice as sweet as sugar… i.e. you add half!).
Hi James, Thank you for sharing. Most likely this wasn’t fully cooked if it stuck to the parchment paper, as I never have to grease it, but I did add a note to the post that you could do that to be on the safe side. I think the previous recipe and post were not clear enough on how to make sure that it’s done, so I updated them and hope that will help. I’d love to know if that made a difference if you try it again. But, this bread is more similar to fluffy pre-sliced white bread than a crusty bread, so I still would not expect a crust. If you are looking for a crusty bread, try this almond flour bread instead.

People who have metabolic syndrome typically have apple-shaped bodies, meaning they have larger waists and carry a lot of weight around their abdomens. It's thought that having a pear-shaped body — that is, carrying more of your weight around your hips and having a narrower waist — doesn't increase your risk of diabetes, heart disease and other complications of metabolic syndrome.


The 2 major issues that will lead to a flat loaf is not whipping the egg whites and gently folding them in OR using almond meal instead of a finely ground almond flour. If you've tried everything and they don't seem to be working for you, the next best option will be to make a larger recipe. Try making 1.5x this recipe (it's easy to do using the servings slide bar) and you'll have a much larger loaf.
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