Metabolic syndrome is quite common. Approximately 32% of the population in the U.S. has metabolic syndrome, and about 85% of those with type 2 diabetes have metabolic syndrome. Around 25% of adults in Europe and Latin America are estimated to have the condition, and rates are rising in developing East Asian countries. Within the US, Mexican Americans have the highest prevalence of metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome increases with age, and about 40% of people over 60 are affected.

The World Health Organization (WHO) was the first to publish an internationally accepted definition for metabolic syndrome in 1998, but the criteria that have received the most widespread acceptance and use in the United States are those established in 2002 as guidelines in the third report of the National Cholesterol Education Program expert panel on Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Cholesterol in Adults (ATP III).


I have been making Maria’s bread in my convection oven for a while and I had to lower the temp considerably to make sure it didn’t burn on the outside (even with a shorter baking time). I have a “portable” convection oven and I had always assumed that convection was the way to go for baking. Then I read some more about it and saw that convection is best for meats, etc. but not for baking, and I tried using the ‘normal” baking setting. My bread was MUCH better baked on normal. I used the temperature in the recipe and the timing and it came out perfect. No monkeying around with settings or duration.
After a period of time, your body becomes adapted to using ketones as fuel instead of glucose. Your muscles begin to learn to convert acetoacetate into a ketogenic substance called beta-hydroxybutyrate, or BHB. BHB then becomes the new preferred ketogenic source of energy, including to fuel all brain activity. What is not needed is expelled from the body as waste.

The secret step in this recipe that takes this carb-free bread from good to great is the separation of the eggs. You’re going to want to separate the yolks and the whites. The reason for this is that we’re going to whip the egg whites until they are fluffy. We’re looking for soft peaks. This will add some volume to the otherwise dense keto bread. Beating the egg whites is the answer to the denseness that comes with making an almond flour bread. I’ve made countless baked goods using almond flour and the main problem I’ve encountered is how dense the finished product is. The fluffy egg whites in unison with the high dosage of baking powder do a good job of getting this loaf nice and fluffy and adding some air pockets into the loaf. This makes for a better tasting bread.
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