82. Schwarz J. M., Neese R. A., Turner S., Dare D., Hellerstein M. K. Short-term alterations in carbohydrate energy intake in humans. Striking effects on hepatic glucose production, de novo lipogenesis, lipolysis, and whole-body fuel selection. Journal of Clinical Investigation. 1995;96(6):2735–2743. doi: 10.1172/jci118342. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [CrossRef] [Google Scholar]
I just want to say that I love your blog and am in love with your brownie recipe!! It’s a godsend and I was just as excited with this recipe as a result. Unfortunately, my bread fell short for some reason..No matter how long I toast it, it’s spongy and moist in the center…I’ve done everything as directed but substituted the butter for coconut oil. I measured it exactly too. Could that be why the bread is awfully wet in the middle or is there another reason? I tasted quite a bit of the psyllium husk as well which was okay..I’m thinking of making it with flax seed next time.
The secret step in this recipe that takes this carb-free bread from good to great is the separation of the eggs. You’re going to want to separate the yolks and the whites. The reason for this is that we’re going to whip the egg whites until they are fluffy. We’re looking for soft peaks. This will add some volume to the otherwise dense keto bread. Beating the egg whites is the answer to the denseness that comes with making an almond flour bread. I’ve made countless baked goods using almond flour and the main problem I’ve encountered is how dense the finished product is. The fluffy egg whites in unison with the high dosage of baking powder do a good job of getting this loaf nice and fluffy and adding some air pockets into the loaf. This makes for a better tasting bread.
×