Please note that information provided through this free Service is not intended to be medical advice and should not be relied on as such. Although the laboratory provides the largest single source of objective, scientific data on patient status, it is only one part of a complex biological picture of health or disease. As professional clinical laboratory scientists, our goal is to assist you in understanding the purpose of laboratory tests and the general meaning of your laboratory results. It is important that you communicate with your physician so that together you can integrate the pertinent information, such as age, ethnicity, health history, signs and symptoms, laboratory and other procedures (radiology, endoscopy, etc.), to determine your health status. The information provided through this Service is not intended to substitute for such consultations with your physician nor specific medical advice to your health condition.
I have a friend that is 35 and has diabetes. For the past eight years, his weight has always been in check and if anything he may have been a little overweight. Just recently, he has lost a lot of weight and he told me that he weighs less than he did in high school. I think he looks too thin and I am concerned about his health with him being a diabetic. Should there be a concern and what kind of advice can you give me to pass on to him.

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, about 84 million American adults are currently facing prediabetes. This equals one in three adults in America. About 90% of these adults do not know that they are currently living with prediabetes and setting themselves up for all the implications this entails. The incidence of diabetes is evidently growing at rapid rates globally. In America alone, about 1.5 million Americans are being diagnosed with diabetes every year. These increases are parallel with the rapid increases in the prevalence of obesity. Annually, diabetes remains the seventh cause of death in the United States and is currently costs about $245 billion in the United States. Due to this, preventing this trending progression should be at the top of the list as a national health focus and strategy. The focus on management and diagnostic studies should come second given that this disease is preventable.[4][5][6]
According to him, whenever you go on a diet, your hunger pangs increase because you tend to begin eating lesser than usual. But most diets don’t prove to be effective because when you feel hungry, you are most likely to give in to your craving for junk food. Dr. Shaikh says, “A smart way to go about your diet is to fill yourself up with proteins first. Some good sources of protein that you could include in your daily diet are from chicken, paneer or dal. Drinking dal is actually a very good habit. These foods make you full faster.”
Your dietitian will show you how you can continue to eat all the foods you love — just probably not in the same proportions as you have in the past. Having diabetes or having "pre-diabetes" does not mean that you can't eat certain foods. The solution isn't "avoid foods with sugar in them." Rather, you need to lose weight if you are overweight, cut back on portion sizes, and plan for those occasions when you eat a small piece of cake or pie.
The calculation below is provided to illustrate the relationship between A1C and average blood glucose levels. This calculation is not meant to replace an actual lab A1C result, but to help you better understand the relationship between your test results and your A1C. Use this information to become more familiar with the relationship between average blood glucose levels and A1C—never as a basis for changing your disease management.
Insulin is the medication that will bring blood glucose down the fastest. Someone who uses mealtime insulin can take correction doses to lower blood glucose. This requires a thorough understanding of when to inject, how often to give correction doses, and how much insulin to use. You will need to work with your doctor or diabetes educator to learn how to do this.

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Changing to a healthy lifestyle takes time and effort. But you don’t have to make all the changes at once. Start small, such as switching from drinking soda to drinking water. Once you’ve made the change, celebrate your progress. Then move on to the next change you need to make. It may take a while, but keep moving forward. Your lifestyle will continue to improve, and so will your health.
Engage in exercise. According to the American Diabetes Association, exercise can help lower your blood sugar level by using the excess sugar as fuel. If, however, your blood sugar level is over 240 mg/dL, use a urine test strip to check your urine for the presence of ketones. When ketones are being produced by the body, exercise can cause your blood sugar levels to rise, rather than decrease. Physical activity can have immediate benefit in lowering blood sugar and also long-term benefit by helping to stabilize blood sugar levels.

The ACP guideline are the most unscientific and irresponsible publication. The studies they used did not used the newer agents we have now. Glp1ra, SGLT2i and DPP4i. Not all medication in diabetes management are created equal when taking in consideration CV data. A person who is 65< can easily surpass 10yrs with good medical care. Ignoring the abundant amount of evidence that demonstrates higher glucose levels causes damage to the patient. Hypoglycemia is a risk when using hypoglycemic agents. With other agents, they can achieve a better glucose control with no hypoglycemia risk.
Hordern, M. D., Dunstan, D. W., Prins, J. B., Baker, M. K., Fiatarone Singh, M. A., & Coombes, J. S. (2011, May 30). Exercise prescription for patients with type 2 diabetes and pre-diabetes: A position statement from Exercise and Sport Science Australia [Abstract]. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 15(1), 25–31. Retrieved from http://www.jsams.org/article/S1440-2440(11)00080-6/abstract?showall=true=

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Another issue that makes weight loss even more of a dilemma is the effect of intentional weight loss on mortality in type 2 diabetes. Williamson et al.25 reported that people with diabetes who had an intentional weight loss in the Cancer Prevention Study I experienced a 25% reduction in total mortality and a 28% reduction in cardiovascular disease-plus-diabetes mortality. Because the cohort was followed for an average of 12.9 years, this suggests a “memory” effect of intentional weight loss, which may be sustained for a long duration even if the weight loss is not fully maintained. In another analysis of 1,401 overweight adults with diabetes sampled in the National Health Interview Survey, individuals trying to lose weight had a 23% lower mortality rate than those who reported not trying to lose weight.26 This suggests that even if weight loss is not achieved, eating less may have long-term beneficial effects.

If your blood sugar drops too low, you can have a low blood sugar reaction, called hypoglycemia. A low blood sugar reaction can come on fast. It is caused by taking too much insulin, missing a meal, delaying a meal, exercising too much, or drinking too much alcohol. Sometimes, medicines you take for other health problems can cause blood sugar to drop.
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