I have a friend that is 35 and has diabetes. For the past eight years, his weight has always been in check and if anything he may have been a little overweight. Just recently, he has lost a lot of weight and he told me that he weighs less than he did in high school. I think he looks too thin and I am concerned about his health with him being a diabetic. Should there be a concern and what kind of advice can you give me to pass on to him.
According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, about 84 million American adults are currently facing prediabetes. This equals one in three adults in America. About 90% of these adults do not know that they are currently living with prediabetes and setting themselves up for all the implications this entails. The incidence of diabetes is evidently growing at rapid rates globally. In America alone, about 1.5 million Americans are being diagnosed with diabetes every year. These increases are parallel with the rapid increases in the prevalence of obesity. Annually, diabetes remains the seventh cause of death in the United States and is currently costs about $245 billion in the United States. Due to this, preventing this trending progression should be at the top of the list as a national health focus and strategy. The focus on management and diagnostic studies should come second given that this disease is preventable.[4][5][6]
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My question is this. How does a type 2 diabetic gain weight while at the same time having a greatly reduced ability to create insulin? A common response from a doctor is that type 2 diabetics do not produce insulin because of an impaired/damaged pancreas due to insulin resistant overload. I as a type 2 diabetic take about 50 units of insulin per day to control my disease.
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Nadia has been on many different diets and has lost weight, but she always gained it back. “I have a shelf full of weight loss books,” she said. “They make really good paperweights.” She was concerned about her health – she had sleep apnea, and type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke run in her family – but she had given up trying to shed the pounds. Then came a wake-up call during a checkup with her doctor.

A reduction in insulin resistance is problematic because insulin is needed to help glucose enter these tissues to be metabolized. If these tissues are resistant to insulin, higher than normal levels are needed for this process to occur. This is often the case in Type 2 diabetes. As a result, a vicious cycle occurs, the higher the insulin levels are, the harder it is to lose weight (insulin is anabolic, and is a hormone that likes to store fat). On the other hand, the heavier a person is, the more likely they are to have higher insulin levels. As you can see, the cycle is often hard to break.
Never avoid going to see your health care team because you feel like a “failure” or are afraid of disappointing your diabetes care team.  The members of your diabetes team are your coaches. They understand there are multiple life challenges that influence diabetes each day and night. Life is always changing, and you/your child will need support along the way.  It is all part of the process of living with diabetes.
How does diabetes affect children and teens? Studies show that many parents cannot identify signs and symptoms of diabetes in children and teens, but type 1 and especially type 2 are becoming more common. Knowing the signs and getting an early diagnosis makes diabetes easier to manage. Find out more about how to recognize diabetes and how to spot the early signs. Read now

Changing to a healthy lifestyle takes time and effort. But you don’t have to make all the changes at once. Start small, such as switching from drinking soda to drinking water. Once you’ve made the change, celebrate your progress. Then move on to the next change you need to make. It may take a while, but keep moving forward. Your lifestyle will continue to improve, and so will your health.
Doctors and people with diabetes have observed that infections seem more common if you have diabetes. Research in this area, however, has not proved whether this is entirely true, nor why. It may be that high levels of blood sugar impair your body's natural healing process and your ability to fight infections. For women, bladder and vaginal infections are especially common.
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