I practice a Cyclical Ketogenic diet where I incorporate a higher carb day once a week. The day following a higher carb day, I follow an intermittent fasting day where I do not eat anything (no fats either) for 20-24 hours. I do this as a cellular cleanse (autophagy) as well as a way for my body to get back into ketosis. Would it be helpful to add an exogenous ketone on this particular “fasting” day to get into ketosis quicker? Would I notice better results or is my own nutritional ketosis enough? I am relatively fit with a pretty low fat percentage for my gender and age, but I am always striving for an even leaner “more chiseled” look.
"Most people I have worked with don't benefit from VO2 max testing," he says, explaining that the test can be discouraging if a client thinks they are in better shape than they are. "I don't like delivering discouraging news, so I only do VO2 max if either someone is completely lost, very stubborn and apparently unfit (to give them objective data), or very fit and wants to know their numbers."
"Some newer research suggests that significant weight loss can lead to a lower metabolic rate than 'normal' for that weight and one that is consistently lower even after the weight is regained," Anzlovar says. "This means that if you started at 200 pounds and now weigh 150 pounds, you will burn fewer calories at rest and during exercise than someone who always weighed 150 pounds. What's even more frustrating for those that want to lose weight is that research has also shown that if the person who lost the 50 pounds regains that weight, his or her metabolism will be lower at 200 pounds than it was before he or she lost the weight." It is unclear if this always happens or why it happens, she added.
Demographic information for the 35 patients (HCV n = 21; non-HCV, n = 14) who completed the three month weight reduction programme and entered the 12 month weight maintenance programme is summarised in table 1. Only one patient did not have an elevated BMI (21 kg/m2) but she had HCV genotype 3 and had experienced a recent weight gain of >10 kg over the prior 12 months. BMI of all patients ranged from 21.2 to 51.4 kg/m2. Median alcohol intake was 0 g/day (range 0–7 g/day). Three patients (HCV, n = 1; non-HCV, n = 2) had type 2 diabetes according to defined criteria.24 At entry, 25 of 35 patients had grade 2 or 3 steatosis, and additional histological features of NASH were present in eight patients (HCV, n = 2 v non-HCV, n = 6; p = 0.04). Ten patients had moderate to severe fibrosis (Knodell fibrosis score ⩾4), including three patients with cirrhosis (HCV, n = 2; non-HCV, n = 1). Of 21 patients with chronic HCV entering the maintenance programme, 10 patients had viral genotype 1, one patient had viral genotype 2, and 10 patients had viral genotype 3.
It may be tempting to blame your metabolism for weight gain. But because metabolism is a natural process, your body has many mechanisms that regulate it to meet your individual needs. Only in rare cases do you get excessive weight gain from a medical problem that slows metabolism, such as Cushing's syndrome or having an underactive thyroid gland (hypothyroidism).
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