Mathijs Drummen, Elke Dorenbos, Anita CE Vreugdenhil, Anne Raben, Mikael Fogelholm, Margriet S. Westerterp-Plantenga, Tanja Adam. Long-term effects of increased protein intake after weight loss on intrahepatic lipid content and implications for insulin sensitivity - a PREVIEW study. American Journal of Physiology-Endocrinology and Metabolism, 2018; DOI: 10.1152/ajpendo.00162.2018

But before I gave up the sweet stuff, I questioned what it would do to my body-would I crave it more than usual? Is there such a thing as a sugar detox? "There are many theories on sugar and addiction, but I don't think there's any concrete evidence proving that a person can be addicted to sugar," says Marie Spano, R.D. and sports nutritionist for the Atlanta Hawks. She thinks the habitual intake and oh-so-good taste are actually what make it difficult to kick a sugar habit (see: The Science Behind Your Sweet Tooth). No one said this was going to be easy!
Taggart AKP, Kero J, Gan X, Cai T-Q, Cheng K, Ippolito M, Ren N, Kaplan R, Wu K, Wu TJ, Jin L, Liaw C, Chen R, Richman J, Connolly D, Offermanns S, Wright SD, Waters MG. (D)-β-Hydroxybutyrate Inhibits Adipocyte Lipolysis via the Nicotinic Acid Receptor PUMA-G. J Biol Chem. 2005; 280:26649-26652. doi: 10.1074/jbc.C500213200 Verdin E. NAD+ in Aging, Metabolism, and Neurodegeneration. Science. 2015; 350:1208-1213.
One type of sugar isn't necessarily better than another, but there's definitely a difference in the foods containing natural or added sugars, says Fear. Case in point: A sugary banana comes with a lot more good-for-you nutrients—and less calories, saturated fat, and trans fat—than a glazed donut. And guess what? One banana actually packs more grams of sugar than that donut. Go figure. What’s more, foods that contain natural sugars usually have other nutrients, such as fiber (as is true with bananas), protein, and healthy fats, she says. Keep reading to find out why this is so important—and instead of focusing on the sugar content of those sweet foods, think about the food’s overall nutritional value, says Fear.
This is a fairly common observation around these parts: “I eliminated wheat from my diet and have limited my consumption of junk carbohydrates like corn and sugars. I lost 38 pounds over three months and I feel great. I initially lost weight rapidly, but have more recently slowed to about 1-2 pounds per week. But my doctor checked some lab values and he flipped! He said that my HDL dropped, my triglycerides went up, and my blood sugar went up 20 points! He wants me to take a statin drug and metformin for my high blood sugar. What gives?”
Blood samples for measurement of liver enzymes, cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, and insulin were obtained after an overnight fast at months 0, 3, and 15. Routine biochemical tests were performed using a Hitachi 747-100 analyser (Roche, Australia). Circulating insulin was determined using the Tosoh AIA600 analyser two site immunoenzymometric assay (Tosoh Medics, San Francisco, California, USA) with a coefficient of variation of 4–5%. Insulin resistance was determined using the homeostasis model of assessment (HOMA)19 with an upper threshold of 1.64.20
Another study examining the effects of a ketogenic diet (30% protein, 8% carbohydrate and 61% fat)  among 12 healthy, non-obese men also demonstrated similar results. The average LDL-cholesterol levels before the participants started the diet were 2.87 mmol/L, they increased to 3.22 mmol/L during the third week of the diet and by the end of week 6, the LDL-cholesterol levels were back to normal (6).

“I always tell clients to balance their carb and sugar intake with protein, fiber, and [or] healthy fats,” says Fear. All three of these nutrients slow the absorption of sugar into your bloodstream, which decreases the spike and crash in your blood sugar and your energy levels, she says. That means you won't feel weak, shaky, or hangry 30 minutes after you eat.
There are several predictors of how fast or slow a person’s metabolic rate will be. These include the amount of lean muscle and fat tissue in the body, age, and genetics. Women tend to burn fewer calories than men. Having a higher metabolic rate means your body uses food for fuel (instead of storing it as fat) more quickly. But you can still gain weight if you consume more calories than your body needs. Counterintuitively, heavier people generally have higher metabolic rates than skinny folks to meet the fuel demands of their larger bodies.
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