People use a ketogenic diet most often to lose weight, but it can help manage certain medical conditions, like epilepsy, too. It also may help people with heart disease, certain brain diseases, and even acne, but there needs to be more research in those areas. Talk with your doctor first to find out if it’s safe for you to try a ketogenic diet, especially if you have type 1 diabetes.

First, a little background: Eric Westman, MD, director of the Duke Lifestyle Medical Clinic, explained to Health in a previous interview that in order to successfully follow the keto diet, you need to eat moderate amounts of protein, reduce your carb intake, and increase fats. When you reduce your carb consumption, your body turns to stored fat as its new fuel source—a process called ketosis. To stay in ketosis, followers of the keto diet must limit their carbs to 50 grams a day, Dr. Westman says.


Keeping a toothbrush handy can do more than polish up that smile (and counter the effects of all that belly-slimming garlic); brushing your teeth throughout the day can also help you ditch that belly fat fast. A study conducted a sample of over 14,000 participants found that brushing after every meal was linked to lower weight. That minty toothpaste flavor not only clashes with virtually every food, brushing may also trigger a Pavlovian response that tells your brain the kitchen’s closed.
Dr. Yaker specializes in liposuction surgery and offers this procedure to Plano area men and women who desire a slimmer appearance. Liposuction (“Lipo”) is a surgery that removes fat from the body. During this procedure, a small puncture is made in the skin and a “cannula” helps to loosen fat cells and suction them out. Common areas for fat removal include the stomach, hips, lower back, thighs, arms, neck and chest. Liposuction is ideal for those who are at a healthy weight and is not an alternative to a weight loss plan, nor is it a surgery to “treat” being overweight. Dr. Yaker offers various techniques including liposuction surgery, ultrasound assisted lipo and laser lipo procedures. Each of these will be discussed during the consultation. 
"The keto diet is primarily used to help reduce the frequency of epileptic seizures in children. While it also has been tried for weight loss, only short-term results have been studied, and the results have been mixed. We don't know if it works in the long term, nor whether it's safe," warns registered dietitian Kathy McManus, director of the Department of Nutrition at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital.
The keto diet works by eliminating carbohydrates from the your daily intake and keeping the body’s carbohydrate stores almost empty, therefore preventing too much insulin from being released following food consumption and creating normal blood sugar levels. This can help reverse “insulin resistance,” which is the underlying problem contributing to diabetes symptoms. In studies, low-carb diets have shown benefits for improving blood pressure, postprandial glycemia and insulin secretion. (7)
Spending more time in the kitchen can help you shed belly fat, as long as you’re cooking with the right foods, according to one 2017 study. After analyzing data from more than 11,000 men and women, UK researchers found that people who ate more than five homemade meals per week were 28 percent less likely to have a high body mass index, and 24 percent less likely to carry too much body fat than those whole only downed three meals at home.
A ketogenic diet could be an interesting alternative to treat certain conditions, and may accelerate weight loss. But it is hard to follow and it can be heavy on red meat and other fatty, processed, and salty foods that are notoriously unhealthy. We also do not know much about its long-term effects, probably because it’s so hard to stick with that people can’t eat this way for a long time. It is also important to remember that “yo-yo diets” that lead to rapid weight loss fluctuation are associated with increased mortality. Instead of engaging in the next popular diet that would last only a few weeks to months (for most people that includes a ketogenic diet), try to embrace change that is sustainable over the long term. A balanced, unprocessed diet, rich in very colorful fruits and vegetables, lean meats, fish, whole grains, nuts, seeds, olive oil, and lots of water seems to have the best evidence for a long, healthier, vibrant life.

Cyclical ketogenic diet (CKD): If you find it difficult to stick to a very low-carb diet every day, especially for months on end, you might want to consider a carb-cycling diet instead. Carb cycling increases carbohydrate intake (and sometimes calories in general) only at the right time and in the right amounts, usually about 1–2 times per week (such as on weekends).
Cut back on calories. The most important part of losing weight is not working out until you collapse — it's your diet. If you burn 500 to 750 more calories than what you eat every day, you will lose 1–2 pounds every week (any more than that is considered unsafe weight loss). There are tons of little changes you can make to cut calories from your diet, from replacing high-calorie dressings with vinaigrette and asking for all dressings/sauces served on the side, eating at the table instead of in front of the tv, skipping cheese and other fatty additions to your salads and meals, using smaller plates, leave off the whipped cream on your coffee drink, and on and on.[2]

Eating the right kinds of fats is crucial if you want to cut down on your belly fat. Some fats will only contribute more to visceral fat, such as saturated fats. Lead author Lucinda Summers from the Oxford Centre for Diabetes says in her research report, if you add polyunsaturated fats, like those found in nuts and certain types of fish, you can benefit from their anti-inflammatory potential and actually help to reduce your visceral fat levels.
Our bodies are incredibly adaptive to what you put into it – when you overload it with fats and take away carbohydrates, it will begin to burn ketones as the primary energy source. Optimal ketone levels offer many health, weight loss, physical and mental performance benefits.1There are scientifically-backed studies that show the advantage of a low-carb, ketogenic diet over a low-fat diet. One meta-analysis of low-carbohydrate diets showed a large advantage in weight loss. The New England Journal of Medicine study resulted in almost double the weight loss in a long-term study on ketone inducing diets.
Metabolic syndrome, also known as Insulin Resistance Syndrome (IRS) and Syndrome X, is a cluster of metabolic and anthropometric traits including glucose intolerance, upper body fat distribution (increased intra-abdominal fat mass), hypertension, dysfibrinolysis, and a dyslipidemia (characterized by high triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein [HDL] cholesterol, and small dense low-density lipoprotein [LDL] particles).1 Metabolic syndrome constitutes a powerful risk factor complex to identify individuals at increased risk for future Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Insulin resistance and abdominal obesity are two central components of the syndrome and are integrally involved in its pathogenesis. Insulin resistance is a metabolic abnormality in which peripheral tissues exhibit a subnormal biologic response to the glucose-lowering action of insulin. Insulin resistance not only antedates the development of diabetes but is also a major metabolic defect (together with impaired insulin secretion and elevated hepatic glucose production) that maintains hyperglycemia in patients with overt disease. The central role of abdominal adiposity underscores the importance of body fat distribution regarding the metabolic consequences of obesity. Individuals with metabolic syndrome are also more prone to develop other pathologic conditions including polycystic ovary syndrome, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cholesterol gallstones, sleep disorders, and some types of cancer. Thus, metabolic syndrome is responsible for a tremendous burden of human disease and social costs, and nutritional therapy is key to both its prevention and limiting its progression to Type 2 diabetes and CVD.
Ultrasonic techniques are available as an internal, canula based, as well as an external one, with paddle application. The high ultrasonic energy produced by passing electrical energy to a piezoelectric crystal creates micro cavities in a liquid or semi liquid medium during the expansion cycle of the sound wave. This property of microcavitation is used in UAL.

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Inner knee, medial thigh or submandibular region [Figure 14] with a less dense fat are better managed with a standard wet technique rather than the UAL. Improved results with less fatigue in treating fibrous areas such as gynecomastia, posterior trunk, upper abdomen, posterior hip rolls and trochanteric regions [Figure 15] support the use of UAL as an adjunct to SAL rather than as an alternative.
The common definition of ‘large volume liposuction’ LVL refers to either total fat removed during the procedure or a total volume removed during the procedure (fat plus wetting solution). Because many of the complications associated with large volume liposuction are related to fluid shifts and fluid balance, classifying the procedure as large volume based on the total volume removed from the patient, including fat, wetting solution, and blood, is more acceptable [Figure 3].
Pomegranate and pomegranate seeds in particular have been shown to help ameliorate metabolic syndrome. Research published in Food & Nutrition concluded that pomegranate “exerts hypoglycaemic effects, including increased insulin sensitivity, inhibition of α-glucosidase, and impact on glucose transporter type 4 function, but is also responsible for a reduction of total cholesterol, and the improvement of blood lipid profiles, as well as anti-inflammatory effects through the modulation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor pathways. These effects may also explain how pomegranate-derived compounds function in the amelioration of adverse health effects caused by metabolic syndrome.” (12)
Although the first formal definition of metabolic syndrome entered medical textbooks not so long ago (1998), it is as widespread as pimples and the common cold . According to the American Heart Association, 47 million Americans have it. That's almost a staggering one out of every six people. The syndrome runs in families and is more common among African-Americans, Hispanics, Asians, and Native Americans. The risks of developing metabolic syndrome increases as you age.
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