Metabolic syndrome (metabolic syndrome X, insulin resistance syndrome, dysmetabolic syndrome, hypertriglyceridaemic waist, obesity syndrome, Reaven syndrome) is the name for a group of risk factors that increase the risk for ischaemic heart disease (IHD), diabetes and stroke (Fig. 23.1). The metabolic syndrome is diagnosed when at least three of the IHD risk factors listed in Table 23.1 are present. Whether the syndrome, which affects possibly 25% of the US population, is a specific syndrome, and nothing more than the sum of its parts, is controversial.
A: The amount of weight you lose is entirely dependent on you. Obviously adding exercise to your regimen will speed up your weight loss. Cutting out things that are common “stall” causes is also a good thing. Artificial sweeteners, dairy, wheat products and by-products (wheat gluten, wheat flours, and anything with an identifiable wheat product in it).
Wondering how many carb foods you can eat and still be “in ketosis”? The traditional ketogenic diet, created for those with epilepsy consisted of getting about 75 percent of calories from sources of fat (such as oils or fattier cuts of meat), 5 percent from carbohydrates and 20 percent from protein. For most people a less strict version (what I call a “modified keto diet”) can still help promote weight loss in a safe, and often very fast, way.

A ketogenic diet also has been shown to improve blood sugar control for patients with type 2 diabetes, at least in the short term. There is even more controversy when we consider the effect on cholesterol levels. A few studies show some patients have increase in cholesterol levels in the beginning, only to see cholesterol fall a few months later. However, there is no long-term research analyzing its effects over time on diabetes and high cholesterol.
Add a cup of low-fat milk, a part-skim mozzarella stick, or a half cup of low-sodium cottage cheese to breakfast, and you may have a belly-busting win. While lots of research links calcium with lower body weights, results from a 2014 study suggest that calcium-containing foods may reduce waist circumference in those genetically predisposed to carrying weight in their midsection.
If antioxidants are the good guys of gut health, trans fats are the supervillains. These sneaky fats actively contribute to your wobbly waist – not just by adding new fat, but by moving fat from other areas of your body to your belly. During a six-year study at Wake Forest University, monkeys that were fed an 8 per cent trans fat diet had 33 per cent more belly fat than monkeys that were fed an 8 per cent monounsaturated fat diet.
The brain is composed of a network of neurons that transmit signals by propagating nerve impulses. The propagation of this impulse from one neuron to another is typically controlled by neurotransmitters, though there are also electrical pathways between some neurons. Neurotransmitters can inhibit impulse firing (primarily done by γ-aminobutyric acid, or GABA) or they can excite the neuron into firing (primarily done by glutamate). A neuron that releases inhibitory neurotransmitters from its terminals is called an inhibitory neuron, while one that releases excitatory neurotransmitters is an excitatory neuron. When the normal balance between inhibition and excitation is significantly disrupted in all or part of the brain, a seizure can occur. The GABA system is an important target for anticonvulsant drugs, since seizures may be discouraged by increasing GABA synthesis, decreasing its breakdown, or enhancing its effect on neurons.[7]
Conklin's fasting therapy was adopted by neurologists in mainstream practice. In 1916, a Dr McMurray wrote to the New York Medical Journal claiming to have successfully treated epilepsy patients with a fast, followed by a starch- and sugar-free diet, since 1912. In 1921, prominent endocrinologist Henry Rawle Geyelin reported his experiences to the American Medical Association convention. He had seen Conklin's success first-hand and had attempted to reproduce the results in 36 of his own patients. He achieved similar results despite only having studied the patients for a short time. Further studies in the 1920s indicated that seizures generally returned after the fast. Charles P. Howland, the parent of one of Conklin's successful patients and a wealthy New York corporate lawyer, gave his brother John Elias Howland a gift of $5,000 to study "the ketosis of starvation". As professor of paediatrics at Johns Hopkins Hospital, John E. Howland used the money to fund research undertaken by neurologist Stanley Cobb and his assistant William G. Lennox.[10]
Arteries (are-te-rease): The blood vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood away from your heart for delivery to every part of your body. Arteries look like thin tubes or hoses. The walls are made of a tough outer layer, a middle layer of muscle and a smooth inner wall that helps blood flow easily. The muscle layer expands and contracts to help blood move.

Research has shown that regulating your sleep scheduled and ensuring that you get more than 5-6 hours per night of sleep can help you reduce your visceral fat stores. However, if you turn around and sleep in two days a week (Saturday and Sunday?), it can add to your visceral fat. According to the Oxford Academic’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, there is a strong independent association between sleep apnea, visceral obesity, insulin resistance, and hypercytokinemia, that may further lead to health complications. Essentially, make a firm sleep schedule, but don’t let your body get too lazy on your days off. Regularity in your Circadian rhythms and metabolic cycles will be helpful for keeping belly fat in check.


Weight loss is the primary reason my patients use the ketogenic diet. Previous research shows good evidence of a faster weight loss when patients go on a ketogenic or very low carbohydrate diet compared to participants on a more traditional low-fat diet, or even a Mediterranean diet. However, that difference in weight loss seems to disappear over time.
Advent of the tumescent technique in 1987 has allowed for safe contouring in ambulatory single session liposuction under regional or general anaesthesia. Safety and aesthetic issues define MegaLiposuction to be in Volume in litres of more than 10% of Body weight in Kgs. 870 cases of liposuction were performed between September 2000 and August 2008. In (65%) cases, the total volume of aspirate was greater then 5 liters. (Range: 5 to 25 liters). In 24% cases, the large volume liposuction was combined with a limited or a total block lipectomy. Regional anaesthesia with conscious sedation was preferred except where liposuction was for above the subcostal region (the Upper Trunk, Lateral Chest, Back, Gynaecomastia, Breast, Arms and Face) or when the patient so desired. Tumescent infiltration with Lactated ringer, adrenalin, triamcinalone and hyalase was made in all cases. This approach has clinically shown less tissue edema in the post operative period than when the conventional physiological saline was being used in place of Ringer Lactate. The amount injected varied from 1,000 ml to 12,500 ml depending on the size, site and area. Local anesthetic was included only to the terminal portion of the tumescent mixture while infiltrating the sub-costal regions, or when above costal region was combined with below costal region being anaesthetized with Spinal Anaesthesia. The aspirate was restricted to the unstained white / yellow fat and the amount of fat aspirated did not have any bearing to the amount of solution infiltrated. There was no major complication. Blood transfusion was given only on one occasion when the patient had been on aspirin and had also received Low Molecular weight Heparin intra-operative. The hospital stay ranged from 8 to 24 hours for liposuction as well as for liposuction with a lipectomy. Serous discharge from access sites, sero-sanguinous fluid accumulation requiring drainage were necessitated in less than 10% cases. Minor re-contouring touch ups were requested in 5% cases. Early ambulation was encouraged for mobilization of third space fluid shifts to expedite recovery and to prevent deep vein thrombosis. More than 10% patients were operated on for Liposuction of other areas, after a gap of 7 days to 6 months. Meticulous perioperative monitoring of systemic functions ensures safety in tumescent megaliposuction for the obese and rewarding results can be achieved in a single sitting.
Metabolic syndrome is a common condition that goes by many names (dysmetabolic syndrome, syndrome X, insulin resistance syndrome, obesity syndrome, and Reaven syndrome). Most people identified as having this syndrome have been educated about the importance of watching for signs of diabetes, having their blood pressure monitored and lipid levels checked, and exercising – but there has been little to tie all of these factors together except pursuit of a "healthier lifestyle."

A: The amount of weight you lose is entirely dependent on you. Obviously adding exercise to your regimen will speed up your weight loss. Cutting out things that are common “stall” causes is also a good thing. Artificial sweeteners, dairy, wheat products and by-products (wheat gluten, wheat flours, and anything with an identifiable wheat product in it).

Suction lipectomy was initially advocated for the treatment of localized collections of fat and for the removal of less than 1500 ml of fat material. However, many patients wish to have multiple areas treated or have diffuse collections of fat. In such instances, the removal of over 1500 ml of material and circumferential lipectomy are necessary to present optimal aesthetic results. However, when over 1500 ml of material is removed, anaesthetic requirements, fluid replacement, and treatment of blood loss become important if the procedure is to be performed safely.

Liposuction surgery sculpts your body, eliminating unwanted pockets of exercise and diet-resistant fat from the buttocks, hips, love handles, saddlebags, thighs, calves, ankles, breasts (including male breasts), back, arms and neck. Liposuction is often combined with other procedures to create a desired shape and is one of the safest and most popular cosmetic procedures.

Carbohydrate facts: Simple = bad, complex = good? Carbohydrates provide energy for the body, but the health benefits they offer depend on the type of carbs we consume. Complex carbs, found in brown rice, for example, contain more nutrients than simple carbs, such as white rice. Refined carbs, such as sugary drinks, are best avoided, as their nutritional value is low. Read now
Metabolic syndrome is also sometimes called dysmetabolic syndrome syndrome X, metabolic disease or insulin resistance syndrome. What is metabolic syndrome exactly? It’s actually the term for a cluster of conditions, including abdominal obesity, high triglyceride levels, high fasting blood sugar levels, high blood pressure or low HDL cholesterol. When a person has three or more of these metabolic risk factors occurring together, then he or she is diagnosed as having metabolic syndrome.

Non-cosmetic applications of liposuction were pioneered or developed by surgeons of other specialties. Liposuction could be used to remove lipomas, angiolipomas, and improve hyperhidrosis. Liposuction techniques can assist in hematoma evacuation. Klein[22] demonstrated liposuction techniques for breast reduction [Figure 4]. Field[23] pioneered liposuction to facilitate flap movement in cutaneous reconstruction, gynaecomastia, [Figure 5] and benign symmetrical lipomatosis (Madelung's disease), and Dercum's disease.
Metabolic syndrome is a serious health condition that affects about 23 percent of adults and places them at higher risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, stroke and diseases related to fatty buildups in artery walls. The underlying causes of metabolic syndrome include overweight and obesity, physical inactivity, genetic factors and getting older.
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