Because metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance are closely tied, many healthcare providers believe that insulin resistance may be a cause of metabolic syndrome. But they have not found a direct link between the two conditions. Others believe that hormone changes caused by chronic stress lead to abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, and higher blood lipids (triglycerides and cholesterol).
We have solid evidence showing that a ketogenic diet reduces seizures in children, sometimes as effectively as medication. Because of these neuroprotective effects, questions have been raised about the possible benefits for other brain disorders such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, multiple sclerosis, sleep disorders, autism, and even brain cancer. However, there are no human studies to support recommending ketosis to treat these conditions.

A well-formulated ketogenic diet, besides limiting carbohydrates, also limits protein intake moderately to less than 1g/lb body weight, unless individuals are performing heavy exercise involving weight training when the protein intake can be increased to 1.5g/lb body weight. This is to prevent the endogenous production of glucose in the body via gluconeogenesis. However, it does not restrict fat or overall daily calories. People on a ketogenic diet initially experience rapid weight loss up to 10 lbs in 2 weeks or less. This diet has a diuretic effect, and some early weight loss is due to water weight loss followed by a fat loss. Interestingly with this diet plan, lean body muscle is largely spared. As a nutritional ketosis state sustains, hunger pangs subside, and an overall reduction in caloric intake helps to further weight loss.
While the lipid abnormalities seen with metabolic syndrome (low HDL, high LDL, and high triglycerides) respond nicely to weight loss and exercise, drug therapy is often required. Treatment should be aimed primarily at reducing LDL levels according to specific recommendations. Once reduced LDL targets are reached, efforts at reducing triglyceride levels and raising HDL levels should be made. Successful drug treatment usually requires treatment with a statin, a fibrate drug, or a combination of a statin with either niacin or a fibrate.
A joint interim statement of the International Diabetes Federation Task Force on Epidemiology and Prevention; National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; American Heart Association; World Heart Federation; International Atherosclerosis Society; and International Association for the Study of Obesity published a guideline to harmonize the definition of the metabolic syndrome.[39] This definition recognizes that the risk associated with a particular waist measurement will differ in different populations. Whether it is better at this time to set the level at which risk starts to increase or at which there is already substantially increased risk will be up to local decision-making groups. However, for international comparisons and to facilitate the etiology, it is critical that a commonly agreed-upon set of criteria be used worldwide, with agreed-upon cut points for different ethnic groups and sexes. There are many people in the world of mixed ethnicity, and in those cases, pragmatic decisions will have to be made. Therefore, an international criterion of overweight (BMI≥25) may be more appropriate than ethnic specific criteria of abdominal obesity for an anthropometric component of this syndrome which results from an excess lipid storage in adipose tissue, skeletal muscle and liver.
A: The amount of weight you lose is entirely dependent on you. Obviously adding exercise to your regimen will speed up your weight loss. Cutting out things that are common “stall” causes is also a good thing. Artificial sweeteners, dairy, wheat products and by-products (wheat gluten, wheat flours, and anything with an identifiable wheat product in it).
So rather than giving one-size-fits-all dietary advice or weaponizing the word “balanced” it might be better if the medical community suggested that there are Individual differences that need to be considered. This might also help those lay folk who have had success with one dietary lifestyle or another also realize that what’s valid for them may not be good advice for others.
Liposuction cannot fix your partner’s aversion to putting the lid on the toothpaste. It can’t help you sort out why dog food commercials make you cry. (So. sob. Cute.) And if liposuction had fingers, it couldn’t magically snap them and make you fit into your high school prom dress. Despite the skill of your plastic surgeon, the many advances in cosmetic surgery and all the magical things you’ve read on the internet, liposuction—like all cosmetic procedures—has its limitations. Understanding those limitations is what stands in the way of you and a successful outcome. 

The patient is prepared circumferentially in the torso and the lower extremity as these can be treated without repeated pepping and repositioning. The patient's skin is painted with 5/10 percent Povidone Iodine solution while he/she stands next to a sterile draped operating table. Upon completion of the skin preparation, the patient lies on the table and is sedated or is given regional or general anaesthesia as required.
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Liposuction can work wonders on problem areas of stubborn fatty tissue that just won’t go away no matter how hard you diet or exercise. However, liposuction shouldn’t be considered a weight loss procedure. In fact, each session of liposuction only removes about 2 to 4 pounds of fat – hardly enough to help make a significant difference to the number you see on the scale.
The popular low-carb diets (such as Atkins or Paleo) modify a true keto diet. But they come with the same risks if you overdo it on fats and proteins and lay off the carbs. So why do people follow the diets? "They're everywhere, and people hear anecdotally that they work," McManus says. Theories about short-term low-carb diet success include lower appetite because fat burns slower than carbs. "But again, we don't know about the long term," she says. "And eating a restrictive diet, no matter what the plan, is difficult to sustain. Once you resume a normal diet, the weight will likely return."

Tumescent liposuction has proven to be extremely safe even with the use of unprecedented large doses of the tumescent solution with dilute epinephrine, this produces intense widespread capillary constriction in the targeted fat, which in turn greatly delays the rate of absorption of the drug. This diluted epinephrine is absorbed into the bloodstream over 24 to 36 hours. This reduces peak concentration of the drug in the blood, which in turn reduces its potential receptor stimulant actions.


The super-wet technique of fluid infiltration is used to maintain an almost bloodless aspirate. Compressive pressure garments are always worn in the immediate postoperative period to keep skin in close contact with underlying muscle and prevent any dead space. This helps to minimize postoperative bleeding, serous oozing, swelling and a third space shift of fluid.
People who have metabolic syndrome typically have apple-shaped bodies, meaning they have larger waists and carry a lot of weight around their abdomens. It's thought that having a pear-shaped body — that is, carrying more of your weight around your hips and having a narrower waist — doesn't increase your risk of diabetes, heart disease and other complications of metabolic syndrome.
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