If you're among the 30% of Americans who sleep less than six hours a night, here's one simple way to whittle your waistline: catch more Zs. A 16-year study of almost 70,000 women found that those who slept five hours or less a night were 30% more likely to gain 30 or more pounds than those who slept 7 hours. The National Institutes of Health suggest adults sleep seven to eight hours a night.
What are the risks of CoolSculpting? CoolSculpting is a nonsurgical method of removing fat from the body. It involves freezing fat cells under the skin, so that they can be broken down and processed by the liver. There appear to be some benefits, and the recovery time is fast. However, side effects and other risks are also linked to it. Learn more here. Read now
Start each day by making a large pitcher of “spa water”—that’s detox water filled with sliced whole lemons, oranges or grapefruits—and make a point of sipping your way through at least 8 glasses before bedtime. Citrus fruits are rich in the antioxidant D-limonene, a powerful compound found in the peel that stimulates liver enzymes to help flush toxins from the body and gives sluggish bowels a kick.
Tumescence is the state of being ‘swollen and firm’ [Figure 2]. Tumescent liposuction uses large volumes of very dilute, hypotonic solutions of a vasoconstrictor agent that is gently injected into the subcutaneous fat and virtually eliminates surgical blood loss. It also permits the procedure to be done under regional anaesthesia with conscious sedation. Local anaesthesia may be supplemented for areas proximal to the level of the regional anaesthesia.
Over 8–10 mmol/l: It’s normally impossible to get to this level just by eating a keto diet. It means that something is wrong. The most common cause by far is type 1 diabetes, with severe lack of insulin. Symptoms include feeling very sick with nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and confusion. The possible end result, ketoacidosis, may be fatal and requires immediate medical care. Learn more
Something that makes the keto diet different from other low-carb diets is that it does not “protein-load.” Protein is not as big a part of the keto diet as fat is. Reason being: In small amounts, the body can change protein to glucose, which means if you eat too much of it, especially while in the beginning stages, it will slow down your body’s transition into ketosis.
Limits of lignocaine dosage have been explored since the development of this technique. Lillis[14] unofficially reported no complications with tumescent lignocaine dosages of greater than 70 mg/kg.[4] Ostad et al,[15] proposed the maximum tumescent safe lignocaine dosage to be 55 mg/kg of body weight. Maximum safe dose of tumescent lignocaine was a major bone of contention in academic discussions. The demonstration that the peak lignocaine concentration in the blood occurs at approximately 12 hours of initiating of the tumescent infiltration as against the 2 hours as was originally conceived was an unprecedented finding. A safe dosage for tumescent lignocaine was shown to be 35 mg/kg to 50 mg/kg by Kleinin.[16] The rate of infusion of the tumescent anaesthesia was shown to be independent of plasma lignocaine levels.
Because the ketogenic diet alters the body's metabolism, it is a first-line therapy in children with certain congenital metabolic diseases such as pyruvate dehydrogenase (E1) deficiency and glucose transporter 1 deficiency syndrome,[35] which prevent the body from using carbohydrates as fuel, leading to a dependency on ketone bodies. The ketogenic diet is beneficial in treating the seizures and some other symptoms in these diseases and is an absolute indication.[36] However, it is absolutely contraindicated in the treatment of other diseases such as pyruvate carboxylase deficiency, porphyria, and other rare genetic disorders of fat metabolism.[9] Persons with a disorder of fatty acid oxidation are unable to metabolise fatty acids, which replace carbohydrates as the major energy source on the diet. On the ketogenic diet, their bodies would consume their own protein stores for fuel, leading to ketoacidosis, and eventually coma and death.[37]
Triglycerides are a common form of fat that we digest. Triglycerides are the main ingredient in animal fats and vegetable oils. Elevated levels of triglycerides are a risk factor for heart disease, heart attack, stroke, fatty liver disease, and pancreatitis. Elevated levels of triglycerides are also associated with diseases like diabetes, kidney disease, and medications (for example, diuretics, birth control pills, and beta blockers). Dietary changes, and medication if necessary can help lower triglyceride blood levels.
Most people experience certain side effects after having liposuction. Common side effects include swelling, bruising, and soreness around the parts of the body where fat was removed. There may also be some localized numbness. Some people may also experience some irritation of the sites where cannulas were placed, and in rare cases there may be small scars at these sites.

The best way to prevent metabolic syndrom is to adopt heart-healthy lifestyle changes. Make sure to schedule routine doctor visits to keep track of your cholesterol, blood pressure, and blood sugar levels. Speak with your doctor about a blood test called a lipoprotein panel, which shows your levels of total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglycerides.
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