Ketone bodies synthesized in the body can be easily utilized for energy production by heart, muscle tissue, and the kidneys. Ketone bodies also can cross the blood-brain barrier to provide an alternative source of energy to the brain. RBCs and the liver do not utilize ketones due to lack of mitochondria and enzyme diaphorase respectively. Ketone body production depends on several factors such as resting basal metabolic rate (BMR), body mass index (BMI), and body fat percentage. Ketone bodies produce more adenosine triphosphate in comparison to glucose, sometimes aptly called a "super fuel." One hundred grams of acetoacetate generates 9400 grams of ATP, and 100 g of beta-hydroxybutyrate yields 10,500 grams of ATP; whereas, 100 grams of glucose produces only 8,700 grams of ATP. This allows the body to maintain efficient fuel production even during a caloric deficit. Ketone bodies also decrease free radical damage and enhance antioxidant capacity.
The metabolic syndrome quintuples the risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Type 2 diabetes is considered a complication of metabolic syndrome. In people with impaired glucose tolerance or impaired fasting glucose, presence of metabolic syndrome doubles the risk of developing type 2 diabetes.[28] It is likely that prediabetes and metabolic syndrome denote the same disorder, defining it by the different sets of biological markers.
Metabolic syndrome (metabolic syndrome X, insulin resistance syndrome, dysmetabolic syndrome, hypertriglyceridaemic waist, obesity syndrome, Reaven syndrome) is the name for a group of risk factors that increase the risk for ischaemic heart disease (IHD), diabetes and stroke (Fig. 23.1). The metabolic syndrome is diagnosed when at least three of the IHD risk factors listed in Table 23.1 are present. Whether the syndrome, which affects possibly 25% of the US population, is a specific syndrome, and nothing more than the sum of its parts, is controversial.
Following a ketogenic diet puts your body into a state of “ketosis,” which is a metabolic state that occurs when most of the body’s energy comes from ketone bodies in the blood, rather than from glucose from carbohydrate foods (like grains, all sources of sugar or fruit, for example). This is in contrast to a glycolytic state, where blood glucose (sugar) provides most of the body’s fuel (or energy).

John Staughton is a traveling writer, editor, and publisher who earned his English and Integrative Biology degrees from the University of Illinois in Champaign, Urbana (USA). He is the co-founder of a literary journal, Sheriff Nottingham, and calls the most beautiful places in the world his office. On a perpetual journey towards the idea of home, he uses words to educate, inspire, uplift and evolve.

Liposuction procedures can be performed on their own or in combination with other procedures, such as facelift, breast reduction and tummy tuck. In fact, liposuction is often part of a combination procedure known as mommy makeover, which typically also includes breast lift and tummy tuck, and is designed to help mothers regain their pre-pregnancy body shapes.
Most people who have metabolic syndrome already have a closely related condition called insulin resistance, which is when the body stops responding to insulin (a hormone produced in the pancreas). After the food we eat is converted into a type of sugar called glucose, insulin is what enables the glucose to enter the body’s cells and be used as energy. For someone who is insulin resistant, however, the glucose builds up in the blood, setting the stage for damage.
Fat layers are treated from deep to superficial in sequence and in parallel tracks. As the procedure is progresses more superficially, canula size can be decreased along with reduction in suction intensity to help decrease risk of irregularity to the surface layers. Most traditional liposuction treatment involves removal of the deeper layers of fat. Superficial liposuction is done in individuals with flaccid skin or Localised Fat Deposits (LFDs) as an aid to better skin retraction. It is accomplished with narrow cannulae that make multiple closely spaced passes in the sub-dermal fat to effect an undermining of the affected tissue.

Often caused by lymph node removal or damage due to cancer treatment, lymphedema occurs because there’s a blockage in the lymphatic system and results in the swelling in leg or arm. A 2017 study involved patients who suffered from obesity and lymphedema and who embarked on a 18-week ketogenic diet. Weight and limb volume was significantly reduced. (5)
Similarly, several studies have demonstrated that up to half or more of patients undergoing PD have metabolic syndrome, and at least one study has demonstrated a significant increase in the prevalence with initiation of PD therapy. The only study that made a head-to-head comparison concluded that metabolic syndrome was significantly more prevalent in patients undergoing PD compared with in-center HD. These observations have raised concerns that PD therapy itself may contribute to the development of metabolic syndrome. However, the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in patients undergoing in-center HD in the only study with head-to-head comparison was substantially lower than in other studies. Moreover, there are two challenges with the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in patients undergoing PD. First, the intraperitoneal instillation of dialysate with PD results in an increase in waist circumference, an important component for the diagnosis of metabolic syndrome. Second, there is continuous systemic absorption of glucose from intraperitoneal dialysate, and hence, patients undergoing PD are never in a postabsorptive state. This results in overestimation of fasting glucose and lipid parameters. Finally, the results from studies examining the association of metabolic syndrome with cardiovascular events or all-cause mortality have been inconsistent. This is not surprising because the individual components of metabolic syndrome themselves do not portend a higher risk for death or cardiovascular events in patients with ESRD, including among those undergoing PD.
• Pancreatic insufficiency — Pancreatic insufficiency is a condition where your pancreas does not produce enough enzymes to help break down and absorb nutrients in your digestive tract. If you have an enzyme deficiency, I suggest having it treated first before embarking on a ketogenic diet, because your digestive system will have a hard time absorbing dietary fats.
Insulin resistance also may increase your risk for metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance is a condition in which the body can’t use its insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone that helps move blood sugar into cells where it’s used for energy. Insulin resistance can lead to high blood sugar levels, and it’s closely linked to overweight and obesity. Genetics (ethnicity and family history) and older age are other factors that may play a role in causing metabolic syndrome.
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