Metabolic syndrome is not merely a single disease but a collection of pathological conditions (i.e., abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and hypertension) that increase the risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Low adiponectin levels directly correlate with the development of metabolic syndrome after adjusting for age, sex, and BMI [106,107]. In a study of Japanese adults, an increase in the number of metabolic syndrome components was associated with decreasing adiponectin levels [108]. Hypoadiponectinemia also appears to be a predictor for the future development of metabolic syndrome in obese individuals [109,110].
People who have metabolic syndrome typically have apple-shaped bodies, meaning they have larger waists and carry a lot of weight around their abdomens. It's thought that having a pear-shaped body — that is, carrying more of your weight around your hips and having a narrower waist — doesn't increase your risk of diabetes, heart disease and other complications of metabolic syndrome.
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