Liposuction evolved from work in the late 1960s from surgeons in Europe using techniques to cut away fat, which were limited to regions without many blood vessels due to the amount of bleeding the technique caused.[18] In the mid-1970s Arpad and Giorgio Fischer created the technique of using a blunt cannula linked to suction; they used it only to remove fat on the outer thighs.[20] Illouz and Fournier extended the Fischers' work to the whole body, which they were able to use by using different sized cannulae.[18] Illouz later developed the "wet" technique in which the fat tissue was injected with saline and hyaluronidase, which helped dissolve tissue holding the fat, prior to suctioning.[18] Lidocaine was also added as a local anesthetic.[18] Fournier also advocated using compression after the operation, and travelled and lectured to spread the technique.[18] The Europeans had performed the procedures under general anesthesia; in the 1980s American dermatologists pioneered techniques allowing only local anesthetics to be used.[18] Jeffrey Klein published a method that became known as "tumescent" in which a large volume of very dilute lidocaine, along with epinephrine to help control bleeding via vasoconstriction, and sodium bicarbonate as a buffering agent.[18]
Snack on portion-controlled fruit, seeds and nuts. One study found that snacking on 42g of almonds per day (instead of munching on something high-carb with equal calories) helped to reduce belly fat and improved cholesterol levels. “The high levels of fibre are proven to combat excess calorie consumption later in the day,” says registered dietitian Lucy Jones.
Polycystic ovarian syndrome. Thought to be related to insulin resistance, this disorder involves the release of extra male hormones by the ovaries, which can lead to abnormal menstrual bleeding, excessive hair growth, acne, and fertility problems. It is also associated with an increased risk for obesity, hypertension, and — in the long-term — diabetes, heart disease, and cancer.
Dr. Yaker specializes in liposuction surgery and offers this procedure to Plano area men and women who desire a slimmer appearance. Liposuction (“Lipo”) is a surgery that removes fat from the body. During this procedure, a small puncture is made in the skin and a “cannula” helps to loosen fat cells and suction them out. Common areas for fat removal include the stomach, hips, lower back, thighs, arms, neck and chest. Liposuction is ideal for those who are at a healthy weight and is not an alternative to a weight loss plan, nor is it a surgery to “treat” being overweight. Dr. Yaker offers various techniques including liposuction surgery, ultrasound assisted lipo and laser lipo procedures. Each of these will be discussed during the consultation. 

Physiological saline was used in the place of RL previously. The author has noted an appreciable reduction in the tissue swelling post operatively after shifting to RL solution in place of conventional normal saline. The hypotonic saline solution results and Ringer Lactate results were identical and hence the current method of Infiltration fluid does not have any hypotonic saline fluid. The intense local vasoconstriction reduces blood loss to insignificant amounts for most procedures [Figure 8].
The surgeon's training. Dr. Schlessinger is a board-certified dermatologist and board-certified cosmetic dermatologic surgeon in Omaha, Nebraska who is well trained in the procedure by the dermatologist who invented this special type of liposuction and has performed thousands of these cases with expertise. His laser credentials are sterling as well, having introduced laser resurfacing to Omaha and the United States in 1994, while introducing laser hair removal to Omaha and the United States in 1997, having performed the FDA qualifying trials for this now universal procedure. Additionally, he was the only investigator in the U.S. who was invited to participate in 3 new Botox competitor product trials.
Usually, there are no immediate physical symptoms. Medical problems associated with the metabolic syndrome develop over time. If you are unsure if you have metabolic syndrome, see your healthcare provider. He or she will be able to make the diagnosis by obtaining the necessary tests, including blood pressure, lipid profile (triglycerides and HDL), and blood glucose.
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