In the United States, children are becoming obese at triple the rate compared with the 1960s, making the study and treatment of this problem paramount. The epidemic of metabolic syndrome in children and adolescents is an international phenomenon, leading the International Diabetes Foundation to publish an updated consensus statement to guide diagnosis and further study of the condition. [51, 52]

A ketogenic diet helps control blood sugar levels. It is excellent for managing type 2 diabetes, sometimes even leading to complete reversal of the disease. This has been proven in studies. It makes perfect sense since keto lowers blood-sugar levels, reduces the need of medications and reduces the potentially negative impact of high insulin levels.

Despite continuous advances in the medical world, obesity continues to remain a major worldwide health hazard with adult mortality as high as 2.8 million per year. The majority of chronic diseases like diabetes, hypertension, and heart disease are largely related to obesity which is usually a product of unhealthy lifestyle and poor dietary habits. Appropriately tailored diet regimens for weight reduction can help manage the obesity epidemic to some extent. One diet regimen that has proven to be very effective for rapid weight loss is a very-low-carbohydrate and high-fat ketogenic diet.[1][2][3]
A daily run or Spin class is great for your heart, but cardio workouts alone won't do much for your waist. "You need to do a combination of weights and cardiovascular training," says Sangeeta Kashyap, MD, an endocrinologist at Cleveland Clinic. Strength training increases muscle mass, which sets your body up to burn more fat. "Muscle burns more calories than fat, and therefore you naturally burn more calories throughout the day by having more muscle," says Kate Patton, a registered dietitian at Cleveland Clinic. Patton recommends 250 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise or 125 minutes of high-intensity exercise a week.
Type 2 diabetes. One study found that being on the keto diet for one year reversed diabetes for up to 60 percent of participants. With an average weight loss of 30 pounds, they dramatically reduced or eliminated their need for insulin and no longer needed oral hypoglycemic drugs. The keto diet is also easier to sustain than the calorie-restricted diet or the protein-sparing modified fast.
Your most immediate and best option is to combine aerobic exercise and exercise involving lifting weights, as you will not only burn body fat but tone your muscles as well, positively changing your hip to waist ratio, and working quickly towards a healthier body in ever aspect. As you burn belly fat, you'll burn fat where it doesn't need to be elsewhere, too!
Getting rid of your belly bulge is important for more than just vanity's sake. Excess abdominal fat—particularly visceral fat, the kind that surrounds your organs and puffs your stomach into a "beer gut"—is a predictor of heart disease, type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, and some cancers. If diet and exercise haven't done much to reduce your pooch, then your hormones, your age, and other genetic factors may be the reason why. Read on for 11 possible reasons why your belly fat won't budge.

• Restricted ketogenic diet — As mentioned earlier, a ketogenic diet can be an effective weapon against cancer. To do this, you need to be on a restricted ketogenic diet. By restricting your carbohydrate and calorie intake, your body loses glycogen and starts producing ketones that your healthy cells can use as energy. Because cancer cells cannot use these ketones, they starve to death.12
The notion that metabolic syndrome, or its surrogate markers hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance, antedate and contribute to the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease, diabetes, and at least some cases of hypertension was proposed many years ago.21,35 Coronary heart disease in the setting of metabolic syndrome can to a great extent be attributed to dyslipidemia (increased dense LDL cholesterol, diminished HDL cholesterol, and hypertriglyceridemia)231 as well as to elevations in blood pressure and blood glucose and the presence of a procoagulant, proinflammatory state.22,228 In addition, some studies suggest that hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance, as well as hyperglycemia, may be independent risk factors.51 Whether elevated FFA levels or a dysregulation of intracellular fatty acid metabolism contribute to atherosclerosis by directly altering the function of endothelium (see the section entitled “Vascular Endothelial Cells and Atherogenesis”) or other cells in the vascular wall remains to be determined. Relevant to this discussion, low levels of adiponectin are associated with an increased risk for coronary heart disease in humans,155 whereas, as noted earlier, overexpression of adiponectin or its globular subunit diminishes the severity of atherosclerosis in ApoE–/– mice.232,233
Interest in body sculpting and cosmetic surgery is at an all-time high. One of the most common questions that patients have when coming in for a liposuction consult is “Is liposuction safe?” Everyone has seen the news stories highlighting bad outcomes, but how often does that really happen? The truth is that complications from liposuction are very rare.  This blog discusses the most common and the most serious risks of liposuction and what you can do to minimize your liposuction risks.
Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.
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