Carbohydrate facts: Simple = bad, complex = good? Carbohydrates provide energy for the body, but the health benefits they offer depend on the type of carbs we consume. Complex carbs, found in brown rice, for example, contain more nutrients than simple carbs, such as white rice. Refined carbs, such as sugary drinks, are best avoided, as their nutritional value is low. Read now

Metabolic syndrome between pregnancies increases the risk of recurrent preeclampsia, according to a retrospective cohort study of 197 women who had preeclampsia during their first pregnancy. Of the 197 women, 40 (20%) had metabolic syndrome between pregnancies. Of these 40 women, 18 (45%) had preeclampsia during their second pregnancy, compared with 27 (17%) of the 157 women without metabolic syndrome between pregnancies. The risk of recurrent preeclampsia increased with the number of components of the metabolic syndrome present. [68, 69]
The cost of liposuction depends on several factors, including the number of body areas to be treated, the type of procedure chosen and the experience of the surgeon. As with any plastic surgery procedure, the main costs of liposuction are the surgeon's fee, the anesthesia fee and the facility (operating room) fee. The surgeon's fee can range from $2,000 to $4,000, while the anesthesia and facility fees together can run $1,200 to $1,500.
Tumescent liposuction is a common approach used by surgeons. It is a suction-assisted (SAL) form of lipo that first injects a liquid agent into the area that is to be treated. The liquid agent includes saline, Lidocaine (a numbing agent) and Epinephrine (a medication that controls bleeding). A cannula is then inserted and passed through the fat deposits, suctioning them out. An attached power-aided motor allows the surgeon to control the speed of the fat removal, which can be as great as a few pounds or as little as several ounces. 

Liposuction is a surgery that removes fat and enhances the actual shape of the body. It does not address skin imperfections caused by sagging skin or cellulite under the skin. During your consultation, a discussion can be had regarding the available procedures, which address and improve skin texture. Some procedures recommended to correct skin laxity include abdominoplasty, thigh lift, neck lift, and butt lift surgeries.
Overweight individuals with metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes are likely to see improvements in the clinical markers of disease risk with a well-formulated very-low-carbohydrate diet. Glucose control improves due to less glucose introduction and improved insulin sensitivity. In addition to reducing weight, especially truncal obesity and insulin resistance, low-carb diets also may help improve blood pressure, blood glucose regulation, triglycerides, and HDL cholesterol levels. However, LDL cholesterol may increase on this diet.
Eating mindfully. A child who learns to see food as fuel and not emotional compensation can start to make better choices at mealtime — for example, selecting complex carbs instead of simple carbs (whole-grain instead of white bread, brown rice instead of white); getting more fiber with beans, fruits, and vegetables; choosing "healthy" fats like olive oil and nuts; and avoiding too many empty calories from soda and sweets.
A keto diet forces the body into a state called ketosis, meaning that the body's cells depend largely on ketones for energy. It's not entirely clear why that leads to weight loss, said Jo Ann Carson, a professor of clinical nutrition at the University of Texas Southwest Medical Center and the chair of the American Heart Association's (AHA) Nutrition Committee, but ketosis seems to blunt the appetite and may affect hormones like insulin that regulate hunger. Fats and proteins may also keep people fuller than carbohydrates, leading to lower calorie intake overall, Carson told Live Science.
Don’t let extra hours lounging in bed stand between you and a flatter belly. While getting enough sleep can help boost your metabolic rate, sleeping in may undo any benefit you’d enjoy from catching a few extra winks. One Obesity study reveals that late sleepers who snoozed past 10:45 in the morning ate nearly 250 more calories over the course of the day, despite eating half as many fruits and vegetables as their early bird counterparts. Even worse, they chowed down on more salty, sugary, and trans-fat-laden fast food than those who woke up earlier. If you happen to head out of the house early, you’re in for an additional metabolic boost; researchers at Northwestern University have found that people exposed to just a short period of early morning sunlight had lower BMIs than their late-waking counterparts.

Anyone with metabolic syndrome should make every attempt to reduce their body weight to within 20% of their "ideal" body weight (calculated for age and height), and to incorporate aerobic exercise (at least 20 minutes) into their daily lifestyle. With vigorous efforts to reduce weight and increase exercise, metabolic syndrome can be reversed, and the risk for cardiovascular complications can be substantially improved.
Among the most common undesirable outcomes of liposuction are 1) incomplete liposuction with very little evidence that liposuction was actually done, 2) excessive liposuction producing an unnatural or disfigured appearance, 3)irregular and uneven results with unsightly depressions in the skin, and 4) large scars that reveal that the patient has had liposuction. Caveat emptor (Buyer beware).

Russel Wilder first used the ketogenic diet to treat epilepsy in 1921. He also coined the term "ketogenic diet." For almost a decade, the ketogenic diet enjoyed a place in the medical world as a therapeutic diet for pediatric epilepsy and was widely used until its popularity ceased with the introduction of antiepileptic agents. The resurgence of the ketogenic diet as a rapid weight loss formula is a relatively new concept the has shown to be quite effective, at least in the short run.

Metabolic syndrome is quite common. Approximately 32% of the population in the U.S. has metabolic syndrome, and about 85% of those with type 2 diabetes have metabolic syndrome. Around 25% of adults in Europe and Latin America are estimated to have the condition, and rates are rising in developing East Asian countries. Within the US, Mexican Americans have the highest prevalence of metabolic syndrome. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome increases with age, and about 40% of people over 60 are affected.

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