Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stöppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology.
This isn’t your ordinary cosmetic surgery center. Imagen is a Liposuction center in Omaha specifically focused on achieving significant, life-changing results for our patients - just read our liposuction reviews. While we advocate living a healthy lifestyle, we also understand that 90% of diets fail and that for many, diet and exercise alone cannot help you achieve the body you desire. If you’re ready to seriously improve the way you see yourself, call us for a complimentary consultation. All you have to lose is the fat!
As you get older, your body changes how it gains and loses weight. Both men and women experience a declining metabolic rate, or the number of calories the body needs to function normally. On top of that, women have to deal with menopause. "If women gain weight after menopause, it's more likely to be in their bellies," says Michael Jensen, MD, professor of medicine in the Mayo Clinic's endocrinology division. In menopause, production of the hormones estrogen and progesterone slows down. Meanwhile, testosterone levels also start to drop, but at a slower rate. This shift in hormones causes women to hold onto weight in their bellies. The good news: you can fight this process. Read on.

That's why I co-wrote the "Fat for Fuel Ketogenic Cookbook" alongside renowned Australian celebrity chef Pete Evans. This book combines research-backed medical advice with delicious, kitchen-tested recipes that will help make shifting to fat-burning much easier. Whether you're just a budding cook or a master chef, there's a delicious meal waiting to be prepared that'll take your health to the next level.


Results can vary. Tumescent liposuction, just the same as regular liposuction, involves suctioning of fat from areas where excess accumulation has occurred. Whether this procedure will have short-term results or long-term results depends entirely on how you diet afterward. Dr. Schlessinger has seen many patients who never again need any help in the areas treated, while others who had poor habits after the surgery needed extra procedures within a year or so. Whatever the case, it is unlikely that the same amount of fat will re-accumulate in the exact same areas.
Instead of subjecting yourself to another endless workout, crank up the intensity and you’ll see results faster than you ever thought possible. The results of a PLOS One study conducted at McMaster University in Ontario reveal that adult male study subjects who exercised intensely for a single minute had equivalent respiratory and metabolic changes to those who worked out at a slower pace for close to an hour, so if you want to burn through that belly fat, say so long to slow and steady.

Cannulae used today are extremely small, typically less than 6 mm, some are very small with an inside diameter of less than 0.6 mm. Blunt-tipped cannulae are standard as they decrease injury to blood vessels and reduce bleeding. The use of multiple side ports allows for efficient evacuation of fat. Manual systems consisting of syringes and canula tips have also been developed as some surgeons prefer the use of quiet and disposable instruments, they are more popular in small local aspirations of isolated fat bulges. They also became popular as a back-up system. Over time, aspiration units developed by manufacturers in consultation with surgeons have gradually become more powerful as well as quieter and allow for an efficient, pleasant surgical environment.


Usually, there are no immediate physical symptoms. Medical problems associated with the metabolic syndrome develop over time. If you are unsure if you have metabolic syndrome, see your healthcare provider. He or she will be able to make the diagnosis by obtaining the necessary tests, including blood pressure, lipid profile (triglycerides and HDL), and blood glucose.
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