Lazy keto diet: Last but not least, the Lazy keto diet often gets confused with dirty keto … but they’re different, as the “lazy” refers to simply not carefully tracking the fat and protein macros (or calories, for that matter). Meanwhile, the one aspect that remains strict? Not eating over 20 net carb grams per day. Some people find this version less intimidating to start with or end with … but I will caution that your results will be less impressive.
When you eat less than 50 grams of carbs a day, your body eventually runs out of fuel (blood sugar) it can use quickly. This typically takes 3 to 4 days. Then you’ll start to break down protein and fat for energy, which can make you lose weight. This is called ketosis. It's important to note that the ketogenic diet is a short term diet that's focussed on weight loss rather than the pursuit of health benefits. 
Bicycles are a great strength-training exercise for your core, which acts as the foundation for your body. Lie on a mat with your back flat against it. Without pulling too hard, place your hands behind your head. Raise one knee and bring one elbow down until they meet halfway and touch in the middle of your chest. Continue to alternate your legs and elbows in a bicycle motion for 30 seconds. Breathe slowly and naturally throughout this exercise. Perform four sets, resting one minute between each.
Diets require discipline, and it is not always easy for people to follow them without indulging in a "cheat day." One day may not make a big difference in the long-term, but a recent study from the University of British Columbia in Okanagan, Canada (UBCO), found that when it comes to the keto diet, a single dose of carbohydrates may have dangerous side effects.
A stair climber offers another popular way to burn fat and calories, but only about 500-600 calories for an 180-lb. man at a moderate pace. “Because of the higher leg lift involved, climbing stairs uses significantly more muscles than just walking—strengthening your legs in a functional way,” says Adams. The primary drawback: Stair climbers can put a lot of weight and pressure on your joints, so it can be difficult for people with bad knees.
The benefit: Researchers at the University of Northern Arizona found that cycling on a stationary bike for as little as 10 minutes reduced fatigue and negative moods, while improving energy levels. The stationary bike is also the perfect vehicle to prevent chunky guys from hurting themselves as they lose the chunks. That's because cycling is not a load-bearing exercise, says Kate Heelan, Ph.D., an exercise researcher at the University of Nebraska at Kearney.
Your best bet? Learn to use a heart rate monitor. The device provides an accurate measurement of how hard you are working. Aim to work at 70 to 75 percent of your maximum heart rate for most rides. If you don't want to invest in a monitor, used the perceived exertion scale instead. On a scale of 1 to 10 (with 10 being maximum exertion), you should feel like you are working at a level 7. You should be breathing deeply, but not exhausted or out of breath.
Because cycling is primarily a lower body sport, riders can lose muscle volume in their upper body. The solution? Year-round resistance training. This doesn’t mean you have to spend hours in the weight room—as little as 20 minutes twice a week during the cycling season and 30 minutes two or three times a week during the winter will maintain and even increase your upper-body muscle mass.
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