I bought this DVD several years ago, and for some reason it just sat on the bottom of my stack of exercise DVD's. I work out everyday -- yoga, pilates, strength -- always to DVD's that have become favorites. I was becoming bored with some of the old favorites and decided to try this DVD. WOW! I LOVE it! Different from all my other pilates routines. She really shakes it up with added cardio, and we do some moves that I've not done before. I'm in pretty good shape, but she had my legs and abs shaking on a few moves.
You can have a completely smooth transition into ketosis, or…not. While your body is adapting to using ketones as your new fuel source, you may experience a range of uncomfortable short-term symptoms. These symptoms are referred to as “the keto flu.” Low-sodium levels are often to blame for symptoms keto flu, since the kidneys secrete more sodium when you’re in ketosis, says Volek. A few side effects:
The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain function. However, if little carbohydrate remains in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.[1] Around half of children and young people with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.[2] Some evidence indicates that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.[1] Potential side effects may include constipation, high cholesterol, growth slowing, acidosis, and kidney stones.[3]
A cardio machine that literally ramps up what the average treadmill can do, incline trainers instantly make running more challenging and are a good choice for low-impact power walking, as well. The key to their intensity is the steep incline, simulating hill climbing at more of a slope than what most treadmills offer, which does wonders for raising heart rate, burning calories and toning leg muscles.
Because cycling is primarily a lower body sport, riders can lose muscle volume in their upper body. The solution? Year-round resistance training. This doesn’t mean you have to spend hours in the weight room—as little as 20 minutes twice a week during the cycling season and 30 minutes two or three times a week during the winter will maintain and even increase your upper-body muscle mass.
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