While a kettlebell workout isn’t technically a cardio-only exercise, its calorie-burning effects are too high to keep off this list. “Kettlebell workouts combine the best of both worlds: strength training and cardio,” says Adams. “In addition, a recent study on the calorie-burning effects of this type of workout puts it at around 20 calories per minute.” This total takes into account not only the aerobic calorie expenditure, but also the anaerobic calories burned. Very few cardio exercises build muscle—this is one of the exceptions. You can expect to burn around 400-600 calories in just 30 minutes, says Adams.
FitFarm is a gym for all shapes, sizes, ages and ability. We don't just workout, we train. We all train for different reasons. Some of us are looking to compete, some are looking to lose weight and some are looking to simply be in good shape. We aim to serve every individual by providing CrossFit classes, personal training and one-on-one sessions. We strive to do this by creating an environment for fitness that is approachable and effective for everyone. At FitFarm, we have built a diverse community in which all feel welcome. As a gym, we seek to make every person grow belief in themselves by helping them overcome fears and pushing them to new levels of success, all while improving physical abilities.
This first is using a power meter. One of the key bits of data a power meter produces is the amount of work done in a ride which is expressed in kilojoules. Kilojoules convert to calories at a rate of 4.186 kilojoules per calorie. However, because we are fairly inefficient at converting our food energy into pedal power, losing about 75-80% to heat production, the actual ratio is approximately 1:1. There is some variation from rider to rider due to differing levels of efficiency but, in general, the accuracy for calorie burn calculated from power meter data is within 5%.
Because cycling is primarily a lower body sport, riders can lose muscle volume in their upper body. The solution? Year-round resistance training. This doesn’t mean you have to spend hours in the weight room—as little as 20 minutes twice a week during the cycling season and 30 minutes two or three times a week during the winter will maintain and even increase your upper-body muscle mass.
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