Frank wrote this training tip 14 years ago but still coaches athletes to this day about making better food choices to achieve healthy sustainable weight loss and ultimately a change in the athlete’s lifestyle. Recently Frank completed the 14 Day Conscious Cleanse.  Stay tuned for what he learned.  To talk with Frank about your cycling and losing weight, please call 720.406.7444 or fill out a New Athlete Questionnaire to set up a Coaching Consultation.  Otherwise you can find him riding and eating healthy in Boulder, CO.

And before we get into it any further, I'd be remiss not to point out another really important detail here: Weight loss isn't for everyone. For some people, it's actually much healthier to ignore your weight altogether, or never think about calories, or focus on literally anything else. That's especially true if you have a history of disordered eating; if that's you, you should talk to your doctor before going on any weight-loss plan at all. In fact, even if you don't have a history of disordered eating you should talk to a doctor about losing weight in a healthy way.
It's a misconception that doing weights bulks you up, it in fact also helps you slim down and revs up your metabolism permanently. So head to the  weight room, and when you feel like quitting, ask yourself why you started. The secret to shedding pounds is actually to build muscles. Go on, workout with weights. Another option is circuit training, which involves moving quickly from one exercise to the next, and burns 30% more calories than a typical weight workout. It blasts fat and sculpts muscle, burning up to 10 calories a minute.
Because cycling is primarily a lower body sport, riders can lose muscle volume in their upper body. The solution? Year-round resistance training. This doesn’t mean you have to spend hours in the weight room—as little as 20 minutes twice a week during the cycling season and 30 minutes two or three times a week during the winter will maintain and even increase your upper-body muscle mass.
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