Check your breathing. The wrong breathing technique can make it harder to get into a rhythm and tire you out faster. “Many people will lift their head too high each time they breathe and it disrupts the flow of their stroke,” Caprio says. Try practicing turning your head just enough so you can take a breath from your mouth without actually lifting your head out of the water, she recommends.
Cycling shorts. Some cyclists prefer to wear shorts, capris, or leggings designed specifically for riding a bike. The shorts are designed with a chamois or pad that helps buffer friction between your body and the saddle. Most shorts also have waistband that is higher in the back and lower in the front to make your forward-tilted riding position more comfortable. Pair the shorts with a cycling-specific top to streamline your riding position.
More and more people are noticing unwanted symptoms from the overconsumption of gluten. You don't have to have a gluten allergy in order to limit how much processed wheat you're eating, and the results may have some benefit. Limiting gluten will naturally decrease how much processed foods, bread and baked goods you're consuming. On the bike, it will also help you from feeling bloated during hard efforts. If you have noticed problems similar to these, you might want to also look for energy bars that are gluten-free or try bringing food such as bananas, oranges or potatoes instead.
This process of burning fat provides more benefits than simply helping us to shed extra weight — it also helps control the release of hormones like insulin, which plays a role in development of diabetes and other health problems. When we eat carbohydrates, insulin is released as a reaction to elevated blood glucose (an increase in sugar circulating in our blood) and insulin levels rise. Insulin is a “storage hormone” that signals cells to store as much available energy as possible, initially as glycogen (aka stored carbohydrates in our muscles) and then as body fat.

Yes, you lose weight when you cut calories, but pounds lost aren’t always fat. Some of your weight loss may also come from muscle tissue. Cyclists that diet often end up thinner, but risk becoming slower and weaker on the bike. As pioneering diet expert Covert Bailey once wrote, “When someone says that they lost 20 pounds, the key question is: 20 pounds of what?” Some dieters can end up having a higher percentage of body fat even as they lose weight. And don’t forget that muscle burns calories. The more muscle volume you have, the more calories your body can burn—even when you’re just lying on the couch.

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