A common mistake made by lots of cyclists who want to lose some weight is going out and riding at a low intensity in the so-called “fat burning zone”. Yes, at lower intensities, our bodies will draw predominately on fat reserves for fuel but, because the effort is so low, total calorie burn will be low also. It doesn’t matter what form, fat, carbs or protein, those calories take, if the balance is negative, you will lose weight. So, if you are looking to lose weight, forget about the fat burning zone.


If you are exercising, especially if you are doing strength work, it is possible for your weight to remain static, or even go up, but you could still be losing fat. Conversely, if you’re being too aggressive with your dieting, the scales could be dropping but you could be losing valuable muscle mass. One of the simplest ways to check whether either of these scenarios apply to you is to either keep an eye on how your clothing is fitting or, if you want a bit more objectivity, take some measurements (chest, waist, hips and thighs). Monitor these along with your weight. Alternatively a qualified fitness professional at your local gym or health club should be able to take some skin-fold measurements for you. Make sure the same person repeats the measurements for you and, by comparing the total sum and individual skin folds, you can track the changes in your body composition. Be wary of scales and hand held devices that use bio-impedance to measure body composition as factors such as hydration level can significantly alter the results they give.
If you think you have addressed all of the issues and common mistakes described in this and the previous article but are still failing to lose, or are gaining, weight, there are a number of medical conditions that can be responsible. Chronic stress, hypothyroidism and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are just a few examples. Also, some medications, especially steroids, that are prescribed for a number of conditions can also make weight loss hard. If you are confused or concerned about your weight loss issues you should consult with your GP.
Near the start of 2018, I decided that I needed to make a change. I made a promise to myself that I would work out 4 times a week, focus on my diet, and make a lifestyle change before my health got any worse. I’ve been working on MySwimPro for almost 3 years and was always finding excuses for not swimming regularly. I was now determined to figure out how I could stick to a plan and not bail.
Yes you can lose fat on a low carb because it’s just another low calorie diet. How do I know this? I’ve done low carb, (Atkins, etc) high carb, (Slimming Word) moderate carb etc and log my food and was shocked each time to see they were all low calorie. After the initial week or so the rate of fat loss is same as any other diet. It’s calories in calories out. Simple. It’s what some call indirect deficit diet placing silly restriction, rules can eat must eat etc. and of course you lose weight but nothing to do with low carb. It works because it’s a low calorie diet.
Heavier people require more energy to move their bodies, which means they generally burn more calories. According to Harvard Health Publications, a 125-pound person cycling at 12 to 13.9 miles per hour will burn about 240 calories every 30 minutes, while a 185-pound person will burn 355 calories. If you increase your speed to 14 to 15.9 miles per hour, you can burn 300 calories at 125 pounds and 444 calories if you weigh 185 pounds.

Cycling shorts. Some cyclists prefer to wear shorts, capris, or leggings designed specifically for riding a bike. The shorts are designed with a chamois or pad that helps buffer friction between your body and the saddle. Most shorts also have waistband that is higher in the back and lower in the front to make your forward-tilted riding position more comfortable. Pair the shorts with a cycling-specific top to streamline your riding position.


It’s not always about how much you eat, but the nutritional balance of carbohydrates, fats, and protein in what you’re eating. Endurance athletes need extra carbs to fuel their rides, fat to feel satiated, and protein to repair your muscles post-workout. It usually isn’t necessary to make radical adjustments to achieve this balance—small changes work best. For instance, don’t eat a whole bowl of chili with meat. Instead, fill half the bowl with brown rice, then ladle a small amount of chili on top. You can also try substituting fat-free yogurt for sour cream and fruit for sweets.
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