Sure, you can get in the pool and just go, but it may also help to have some structure in place for your workout. If you prefer to just swim laps, Matheny recommends aiming to swim 1,000 yards in 30 minutes. (For the record, most swimming pools you'll find at your gym or community center are 25 yards long.) But if you want more specific swimming exercises, Lin suggests trying these:
My point here is that the warnings about the ketogenic principles are well taken and well documented. My concern is implications that this is a fad. I don’t use the word diet with my patients and I’m concerned that the principles behind the label and the real results that these readers have commented on might get minimized. I have found it best to encourage patients to read authors like: Stephen Phinney, Jeff Volek, Patricia Daly, and Charles Gant and the be partners with their doctors and check blood work as they move along. I am not for or against the article. If ketogenic principles offer people enduring, satisfying, and cohesive change then why not read about its potential and flexilbity?
Long-term use of the ketogenic diet in children increases the risk of slowed or stunted growth, bone fractures, and kidney stones.[18] The diet reduces levels of insulin-like growth factor 1, which is important for childhood growth. Like many anticonvulsant drugs, the ketogenic diet has an adverse effect on bone health. Many factors may be involved such as acidosis and suppressed growth hormone.[38] About one in 20 children on the ketogenic diet develop kidney stones (compared with one in several thousand for the general population). A class of anticonvulsants known as carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (topiramate, zonisamide) are known to increase the risk of kidney stones, but the combination of these anticonvulsants and the ketogenic diet does not appear to elevate the risk above that of the diet alone.[39] The stones are treatable and do not justify discontinuation of the diet.[39] Johns Hopkins Hospital now gives oral potassium citrate supplements to all ketogenic diet patients, resulting in one-seventh of the incidence of kidney stones.[40] However, this empiric usage has not been tested in a prospective controlled trial.[9] Kidney stone formation (nephrolithiasis) is associated with the diet for four reasons:[39]
While it’s important to eat your vegetables, everything is fine in moderation. If you have a sweet tooth, eat a small portion of candy or dessert once in a while. If you always deprive yourself, you might be more likely to binge. You also need to be honest with yourself about what you are eating, says Frank Overton, owner and founder of FasCat Coaching in Boulder, Colorado. “There is so much crap that people have in their diet that is just out of habit,” he says. “Try to reduce or cut out soda, sugar, and junk food. Have a few less beers each week, or drink wine since it typically has fewer calories.”
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