The bulk of our immune system lives along our digestive tract. Consequently, food can have a detrimental impact if it’s promoting things like leaky gut and inflammatory responses. Those conditions hurt energy levels and recovery. Goglia notes there are some basic inflammatory foods: “no yeast, no mold, no dairy, no gluten, no refined sugars.” He recommends replacing bread with single-ingredient carbohydrates such as rice and yams.
How: Start with your feet shoulder-width apart and squat down until your thighs are parallel to the floor. From the bottom of the squat, place your hands on the floor and kick your legs out behind you into a press-up position. Push up until your arms straight and then tuck in your legs at the bottom of the squat position. Drive upwards through your heels until you are 6 inches off the floor and then repeat.

8. Relax with the marathon workouts. You might feel like a rock star when you double up on fitness classes or outlast the girl on the next elliptical. But unless you're a pro athlete or you're training for a competition, "no one needs to work out for more than an hour and 15 minutes — more is not better," Jackowski says. Overdo it, and you'll set yourself up for stress fractures, insomnia, and exhaustion, all of which could put an end to your exercise routine and stand in the way of your weight loss goals.
Because cycling is primarily a lower body sport, riders can lose muscle volume in their upper body. The solution? Year-round resistance training. This doesn’t mean you have to spend hours in the weight room—as little as 20 minutes twice a week during the cycling season and 30 minutes two or three times a week during the winter will maintain and even increase your upper-body muscle mass.
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