Neville, C., Henwood, T., Beattie, E., & Fielding, E. (2013, July 3). Exploring the effect of aquatic exercise on behaviour and psychological well‐being in people with moderate to severe dementia: A pilot study of the Watermemories Swimming Club [Abstract]. Australasian Journal On Ageing, 33(2), 124–127. Retrieved from https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/ajag.12076
During physical activities, our lungs send oxygen to our muscles. The larger the lungs, the more oxygen our muscles receive. Strong, healthy lungs not only improve sports performance but prevent ailments to the body. Low lung capacity results in less oxygen entering the bloodstream and reaching the cells. Aerobic exercise like swimming is excellent for building lung capacity. During aerobic exercise, your heart rate increases alongside your lung efficiency. Swimming is an aerobic exercise as it activates the large muscle groups that require large volumes of oxygen to perform their task.
Dr. Campos, it is unfortunate that you retain the medical community’s negative stance on the ketogenic diet, probably picked up in medical school when you studied ketoacidosis, in the midst of an obesity and type II diabetes epidemic that is growing every year, especially among populations who will never see the Harvard Health Letter. The medical community has failed in reversing this trend, especially among children, and the public is picking up the tab, in the form of higher health insurance premiums to treat chronic metabolic diseases which doctors cannot cure. The ketogenic diet does not bid its adherents to eat unhealthy processed meats, and the green leafy vegetables that it emphasizes are important in a number of nutritional deficiencies. People lose weight on the ketogenic diet, they lose their craving for sugar, they feel more satiety, they may become less depressed, their insulin receptors sensitivity is improved, and these are all the good outcomes you fail to mention. There is a growing body of research which demonstrates the neuroprotective effects of the ketogenic diet to slow cancer progression, as well as diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, for which there are no effective medical treatments. Please respect your patients by providing them with evidence-based medical outcomes, not opinions.
Also, think about whether commuting by bike at least some of the time is feasible for you. It’s a great strategy because you have to spend time commuting anyway. If you can commute by bike even a couple of times a week, you will burn extra calories twice a day (because once you get to work on a bike, you often have no choice but to use the bike to get back home again!)

In my book "Fat for Fuel," I sought to educate readers about the benefits of using healthy fats as a catalyst to bring about improved mitochondrial function, thus allowing you to achieve better health. In essence, the book answers WHY it is important for you to consume healthy fats. However, you still need to know HOW to prepare the right ketogenic foods in an appetizing way.

Pilates helps to build lean muscle, which increases how many calories you burn daily. As a result, your metabolism increases. Pilates may look simple, but the intentional and often tiny movements increase muscle tone and improve functional strength. Pilates helps you to use your deepest muscles, and research has even shown it improves muscle endurance.
If you typically burn 1200 calories in a normal day and you add a 300 calorie workout to your routine, you will be burning a total of 1500 calories or 25 percent more than you were before you added the workout. This applies for all exercise that you add on to your existing regimen, not just Pilates. However, it is important to understand that an uptick in your activity is an uptick in your calorie burn which leads directly to weight loss.
In essence, it is a diet that causes the body to release ketones into the bloodstream. Most cells prefer to use blood sugar, which comes from carbohydrates, as the body’s main source of energy. In the absence of circulating blood sugar from food, we start breaking down stored fat into molecules called ketone bodies (the process is called ketosis). Once you reach ketosis, most cells will use ketone bodies to generate energy until we start eating carbohydrates again. The shift, from using circulating glucose to breaking down stored fat as a source of energy, usually happens over two to four days of eating fewer than 20 to 50 grams of carbohydrates per day. Keep in mind that this is a highly individualized process, and some people need a more restricted diet to start producing enough ketones.
Also, think about whether commuting by bike at least some of the time is feasible for you. It’s a great strategy because you have to spend time commuting anyway. If you can commute by bike even a couple of times a week, you will burn extra calories twice a day (because once you get to work on a bike, you often have no choice but to use the bike to get back home again!)
While doing Pilates alone won’t make you drop a dress size in a week, it does contribute to the amount of time you spend moving in a day. And the more movement you do, the more calories you burn. Whether you’re just getting back into the world of exercise or you’re a fitness expert, Pilates can help you stay active, especially if you’re not looking for a high-impact workout.

Sit on the mat with your knees bent to your chest and your hands wrapped tightly around the fronts of your ankles. Tuck your head down between your knees, and pull your abs in and up away from the thighs (A). Roll onto your upper back (never allowing the weight of your body to rest on your cervical vertebrae), and roll back up to balance on your tail—but this time, when you roll forward, press your knees and feet tightly together, release your hands, and jump up into the air (B, C, D, and E). Land softly, and reverse the movements back to the mat. Roll back and cannonball up four to six times.
Kneel in the middle of your mat with a long waist. Put your left hand, palm down, on the mat while extending your right leg out to the side, in line with your hip. Your right hand should be behind your head, your hip over your knee, and your shoulder over your wrist (A). On a swift inhale, swing your right leg back powerfully without shifting your hips in front of your knee or disturbing your upper-body position (B). Exhale forcibly as you kick your leg forward without shifting your hips back or changing the position of your chest and elbow (C). Kick front and back eight times, and then switch sides, using swinging back to open the front body, and using all eight opportunities of kicking front to deepen your scoop.
Swimming for weight loss is extremely efficient. Of course, it’s important to remember that – as with any exercise, coupling a healthy diet with your routine is key to weight loss. Not only does swimming help you lose weight, it burns calories intensively, and works all the major muscles in your body at once – all without stressing your body or joints. Weight loss is a journey that’s different for everybody. How and when a person loses weight largely depends on their diet, their commitment to the workout plan and often overlooked – their genetics.
Having worked as a certified fitness trainer for over 23 years, I’ve long since come to the conclusion that if you’re looking for the best exercise to shed a few pounds—and keep them off—nothing beats cycling. Over the years, I’ve seen clients shed half their size and heard from readers who have lost more than 100 pounds by adding cycling to their weight loss arsenal, which, yes, must include a healthy diet. (But you already knew that.)
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