First reported in 2003, the idea of using a form of the Atkins diet to treat epilepsy came about after parents and patients discovered that the induction phase of the Atkins diet controlled seizures. The ketogenic diet team at Johns Hopkins Hospital modified the Atkins diet by removing the aim of achieving weight loss, extending the induction phase indefinitely, and specifically encouraging fat consumption. Compared with the ketogenic diet, the modified Atkins diet (MAD) places no limit on calories or protein, and the lower overall ketogenic ratio (about 1:1) does not need to be consistently maintained by all meals of the day. The MAD does not begin with a fast or with a stay in hospital and requires less dietitian support than the ketogenic diet. Carbohydrates are initially limited to 10 g per day in children or 20 g per day in adults, and are increased to 20–30 g per day after a month or so, depending on the effect on seizure control or tolerance of the restrictions. Like the ketogenic diet, the MAD requires vitamin and mineral supplements and children are carefully and periodically monitored at outpatient clinics.[48]

Failing to allow yourself a few treats or indulgences will only set you up for failure in the future. Allow yourself some candy or a beer along the way and you’ll be more likely to stick with a program over time. Of course every ride doesn’t deserve a double scoop of ice cream or a half dozen beers as reward. Be judicious and selective on the treats. Similarly, don’t reduce your overall calories significantly if you are riding more. You may even need to eat more to actually fuel your weight loss. Measure your success by your mood. If you’re feeling grumpy and deprived, you are pushing too hard.
And before we get into it any further, I'd be remiss not to point out another really important detail here: Weight loss isn't for everyone. For some people, it's actually much healthier to ignore your weight altogether, or never think about calories, or focus on literally anything else. That's especially true if you have a history of disordered eating; if that's you, you should talk to your doctor before going on any weight-loss plan at all. In fact, even if you don't have a history of disordered eating you should talk to a doctor about losing weight in a healthy way.
The ketogenic diet is calculated by a dietitian for each child. Age, weight, activity levels, culture, and food preferences all affect the meal plan. First, the energy requirements are set at 80–90% of the recommended daily amounts (RDA) for the child's age (the high-fat diet requires less energy to process than a typical high-carbohydrate diet). Highly active children or those with muscle spasticity require more food energy than this; immobile children require less. The ketogenic ratio of the diet compares the weight of fat to the combined weight of carbohydrate and protein. This is typically 4:1, but children who are younger than 18 months, older than 12 years, or who are obese may be started on a 3:1 ratio. Fat is energy-rich, with 9 kcal/g (38 kJ/g) compared to 4 kcal/g (17 kJ/g) for carbohydrate or protein, so portions on the ketogenic diet are smaller than normal. The quantity of fat in the diet can be calculated from the overall energy requirements and the chosen ketogenic ratio. Next, the protein levels are set to allow for growth and body maintenance, and are around 1 g protein for each kg of body weight. Lastly, the amount of carbohydrate is set according to what allowance is left while maintaining the chosen ratio. Any carbohydrate in medications or supplements must be subtracted from this allowance. The total daily amount of fat, protein, and carbohydrate is then evenly divided across the meals.[37]
The muscles on the backside of the body are large and dense. Increasing their strength and volume will impact your metabolism. Sit tall with your legs together in front of you and your hands behind your hips. The fingers face forward. Press the hips up in the air making a straight line with your body. Hold for 5 breaths. Lower and repeat 5 to 8 times. As you progress you can add a kicking motion, raising one leg at a time.
OK, that’s all good but you still need to hit your “climbing” weight. Well, as Eddy Merckx rather eloquently said, “Eat Less, Ride More”. Don’t we all wish. Basically it all comes down to taking in fewer calories than your daily caloric requirements, otherwise known as a caloric deficit. Some athletes can successfully ‘diet by math‘ to lose weight and if you want to try, I recommend a 500 calorie caloric deficit per day.  Over 1 week that is 1 lb.  10 weeks = 10 lbs.  Don’t diet more than that because your power on the bike and recovery off the bike will decrease.
Because cycling is primarily a lower body sport, riders can lose muscle volume in their upper body. The solution? Year-round resistance training. This doesn’t mean you have to spend hours in the weight room—as little as 20 minutes twice a week during the cycling season and 30 minutes two or three times a week during the winter will maintain and even increase your upper-body muscle mass.
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