Even an intense cycling routine might not be enough to enable you to lose a pound a week if it's all you're doing. Instead, you'll need to focus on cutting calories from your diet. Eating several smaller meals each day can help you feel fuller. Focus on healthy, filling foods such as nuts, fruits, vegetables and lean meats, and avoid high-calorie foods that have no nutritional value, such as sweetened drinks and sodas and sugary snacks.
Experts will argue all day over which form of exercise is ‘best’ for losing weight. Our answer is simple: all things in moderation. Ideally, aim to fit in a couple of interval sessions in the week and a longer ride when you have time on the weekend. This will train your body in both fat burning and high intensity, strength building directions. And it’ll keep you motivated thanks to the varying styles of training.
With the clients who do not opt for nutritional counseling, I sneak tips and tricks in during their sessions … I can’t help it! What is the point of spending time and money on physical fitness if you aren’t feeding your body with the nutrients it needs to support the external work you are doing? Good nutrition is the most important factor in maintaining and building health, fitness and vitality!
Yes, you lose weight when you cut calories, but pounds lost aren’t always fat. Some of your weight loss may also come from muscle tissue. Cyclists that diet often end up thinner, but risk becoming slower and weaker on the bike. As pioneering diet expert Covert Bailey once wrote, “When someone says that they lost 20 pounds, the key question is: 20 pounds of what?” Some dieters can end up having a higher percentage of body fat even as they lose weight. And don’t forget that muscle burns calories. The more muscle volume you have, the more calories your body can burn—even when you’re just lying on the couch.
×