But every body is different, and research suggests that some people lose more or less weight than others—even when they do the same amount of exercise. However, making exercises, like swimming, a part of your regular routine can help you reach or maintain a healthy weight. If you’re trying to drop pounds, consider aiming to do moderate or vigorous exercises like swimming for around an hour a day.
Certain studies suggest that keto diets may “starve” cancer cells. A highly processed, pro-inflammatory, low-nutrient foods can feed cancer cells causing them to proliferate. What’s the connection between high-sugar consumption and cancer? The regular cells found in our bodies are able to use fat for energy, but it’s believed that cancer cells cannot metabolically shift to use fat rather than glucose. (11)
Thanks for this inputs. 20 years ago I gain 17 pounds a year for 5 years. I was healthy but my dr told me start diet, any diet just come back in a month I want to see you start loosing… I started Atkins and lost 7 pound in a month. She was checking my progress every six months and checking my condition. I lost 64 pounds in 3 years. Now I started eating out of control. I am eating healthy but too much… I gain 40 pound back after 20 years. Now I will start again my Atkins to take off 30 pounds…
While most people start cycling for different reasons, two common benefits to taking part in the sport are increased fitness and staying trim. But just because you ride your bike a few times a week doesn't mean you can eat whatever you want to. In fact, most beginning cyclists make the mistake of overeating because they feel good about the exercise that they've done, making the workout counterproductive to weight loss.

I also feel it’s important to mix things up and always be trying new things. Adding in a barre or spin class or even long walks, will keep the body challenged and prevent boredom. Lastly, when it comes to Pilates, it needs to continue outside of the studio. Even if it’s 15 minutes a day, establishing a home practice of select mat exercises that work for each individual will allow big leaps to happen in-studio!

The ketogenic diet is a high-fat, adequate-protein, low-carbohydrate diet that in medicine is used primarily to treat difficult-to-control (refractory) epilepsy in children. The diet forces the body to burn fats rather than carbohydrates. Normally, the carbohydrates contained in food are converted into glucose, which is then transported around the body and is particularly important in fueling brain function. However, if little carbohydrate remains in the diet, the liver converts fat into fatty acids and ketone bodies. The ketone bodies pass into the brain and replace glucose as an energy source. An elevated level of ketone bodies in the blood, a state known as ketosis, leads to a reduction in the frequency of epileptic seizures.[1] Around half of children and young people with epilepsy who have tried some form of this diet saw the number of seizures drop by at least half, and the effect persists even after discontinuing the diet.[2] Some evidence indicates that adults with epilepsy may benefit from the diet, and that a less strict regimen, such as a modified Atkins diet, is similarly effective.[1] Potential side effects may include constipation, high cholesterol, growth slowing, acidosis, and kidney stones.[3]
The best way to increase weight loss is to bump up your ride time, and the easiest way to do that is to commute to and from work, even if it’s one or two days a week. If you are already commuting, plan some alternate routes that add a few additional miles. The extra time in the saddle will pay off greatly when it comes to losing weight and getting fit.

Frank wrote this training tip 14 years ago but still coaches athletes to this day about making better food choices to achieve healthy sustainable weight loss and ultimately a change in the athlete’s lifestyle. Recently Frank completed the 14 Day Conscious Cleanse.  Stay tuned for what he learned.  To talk with Frank about your cycling and losing weight, please call 720.406.7444 or fill out a New Athlete Questionnaire to set up a Coaching Consultation.  Otherwise you can find him riding and eating healthy in Boulder, CO.
Chris Ryan, C.S.C.S., is a former Division I athlete and top fitness model who regularly appears in numerous magazines ranging from Men’s Fitness, Men’s Health, Men’s Journal, and Women’s Health. His diverse clientele includes Under Armour, Reebok, Nike, Everlast, and Cybex. After the 10,000th question about what he does to stay in shape, Chris thought it was time to put pen to paper, or finger to iPad, to share his years of fitness knowledge. Motivational and always fun, Chris is ready to help you blast through your road blocks and maximize your fitness potential. Your happy, healthy life awaits!
Because cycling is primarily a lower body sport, riders can lose muscle volume in their upper body. The solution? Year-round resistance training. This doesn’t mean you have to spend hours in the weight room—as little as 20 minutes twice a week during the cycling season and 30 minutes two or three times a week during the winter will maintain and even increase your upper-body muscle mass.
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