It is important to choose a doctor who has performed a number of liposuction procedures with good results. Even if a plastic surgeon has a great reputation for tummy tucks or facelifts, if he has firsthand knowledge of liposuction, he is probably not the right choice for your treatment. It is also advantageous to choose a doctor who is trained in dealing with surgical complications. Although the likelihood that you will experience adverse effects is low, selecting a doctor with specialized training in this area can minimize your risks even further.
The cost of liposuction depends on several factors, including the number of body areas to be treated, the type of procedure chosen and the experience of the surgeon. As with any plastic surgery procedure, the main costs of liposuction are the surgeon's fee, the anesthesia fee and the facility (operating room) fee. The surgeon's fee can range from $2,000 to $4,000, while the anesthesia and facility fees together can run $1,200 to $1,500.
It’s impossible to target belly fat specifically when you diet. But losing weight overall will help shrink your waistline; more importantly, it will help reduce the dangerous layer of visceral fat, a type of fat within the abdominal cavity that you can’t see but that heightens health risks, says Kerry Stewart, Ed.D. , director of Clinical and Research Physiology at Johns Hopkins.

Aside from the various keto-friendly foods mentioned in this article, you may be wondering if there are other options that may help support your ketogenic diet. If you find that the ketogenic diet is limiting when you start out, don't worry. There's actually a lot you can add to your diet that's "keto" as long as consumption is controlled. Here are some commonly asked questions:


At the core of the classic keto diet is severely restricting intake of all or most foods with sugar and starch (carbohydrates). These foods are broken down into sugar (insulin and glucose) in our blood once we eat them, and if these levels become too high, extra calories are much more easily stored as body fat and results in unwanted weight gain. However, when glucose levels are cut off due to low-carb intake, the body starts to burn fat instead and produces ketones that can be measured in the blood (using urine strips, for example).
The concept of removing excess fat from localized body sites to achieve similar gains is credited to Charles Dujarrier, who in France,[2–4] attempted to remove subcutaneous fat using a uterine curette on calves and knees of a ballerina in 1921. An inadvertent injury of the femoral artery led to amputation of the dancer's leg. This unfortunate complication arrested further progress in this field and but it was a valiant attempt at the time.[5]
Usually, there are no immediate physical symptoms. Medical problems associated with the metabolic syndrome develop over time. If you are unsure if you have metabolic syndrome, see your healthcare provider. He or she will be able to make the diagnosis by obtaining the necessary tests, including blood pressure, lipid profile (triglycerides and HDL), and blood glucose.
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