Interestingly, a few years ago the American Heart Association lowered the recommended intake of saturated fat to no more than 7% of total calories eaten each day. Olive oil is 14% saturated fat. (The average American consumes a diet with about 14% saturated fat.) So if you’re using a lot of olive oil on your food, it’d be hard to have a diet that’s less than 14% saturated fat, which means your arteries are being subjected to double the saturated-fat-limit that the AHA recommends.
Doctors and medical professionals in United States are increasingly advocating a Mediterranean diet plan as research uncovers its many health benefits. A groundbreaking 2013 study by the University of Barcelona made the connection between the Mediterranean diet and cardiovascular health strikingly clear. Over 7,000 Spanish participants—many of whom were overweight, smokers, or diabetic—adopted a Mediterranean-style diet rich in healthy fats (olive oil or nuts) for nearly five years. After a comprehensive follow-up, surprised researchers ended the study early after observing a sharp improvement in participants’ health. The findings showed an “absolute risk reduction,” or a 30% decrease of cardiovascular disease among these high-risk individuals. The results, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, made news across the U.S. as evidence enough that everyone, from high-risk to healthy individuals, can benefit by eating Mediterranean diet foods.
A weight loss transformation photo can only say so much about a person's past, their struggles, their victories, and the day-to-day steps they took to make a lasting change. Neither of us have had to lose a substantial amount of weight, so we need to learn from real people who have incredible weight loss transformation stories. We can all relate in one way or another.
Judy Ridgway is an acclaimed food writer and international expert on olive oil. She was the first non-Italian judge to sit on the judging panel of the prestigious Leone d'Oro international awards for olive oil. She travels frequently to the producing regions meeting the growers and tasting the oils along the way. She is also in regular contact with specialist cooking schools, university agricultural departments and research institutes. Previous books featuring olive oil include two editions of Judy Ridgway's Best Olive Oil Buys Round the World and The Olive Oil Companion. She also has extensive experience of national TV and radio.
In this new study published in the European Journal of Nutrition, researchers from the Federal University of Viçosa in Brazil,  had a group of middle aged, overweight women receive a high fat breakfast that included 25 ml of oil. One group was given olive oil while the other group was given soybean oil. The oils were added to shakes that were consumed every morning. The participants were following a calorie restricted diet prescribed by a dietitian. After 9 weeks on this diet, both groups had lost weight, although the olive oil group had lost more weight but also more body fat. In fact, the olive oil group had 80% more body fat loss than the soybean oil group. The researchers noted that the results indicate that extra virgin olive oil should be included into calorie restricted programs for obesity treatment.
Try stress reduction techniques: Examine the stresses in your life and see if you can do anything to alleviate any of them. Stress increases cortisol release. But don’t stress about stress — that is no win. Many women during menopause find they are caught in the sandwich of still dependent children but aging or ill parents. Death of loved ones and loss are common during the menopausal years.
Your individual fat adaptation period. Remember your body needs time to become fat-adapted and that time depends on your metabolism. For instance, if you’re coming off a Standard American Diet (SAD) and your adult body has never run on ketones before, your adaptation period might take a little longer. You’ll only experience the true weight loss effects of keto when your body is actually running on ketones. 

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Furthermore, the participants who ate the low-carbohydrate diet lost an average of 0.8% body fat while those that ate the low-fat diet gained an average of 0.7% body fat. [18] This suggests that a higher fat diet may improve may lead to more favorable changes in body composition. Subjects in both groups notably reduced their waist circumference. [18] However, the reduction was greater for the low-carbohydrate group. [18]
If you look at your diet and worry that there's barely a green to be seen, this is the perfect opportunity to fit in more veggies. A good way to do this is to eat one serving at snacktime, like crunching on bell pepper strips or throwing a handful of spinach into a smoothie), and one at dinner, like these quick and easy side dishes. Aim for at least two servings per day. More is better. At least three servings can help you bust stress, Australian research notes.
Unsaturated fatty acids, whether monounsaturated or polyunsaturated, can lower your levels of "bad" cholesterol (which decreases your risk of heart disease) if you eat them instead of saturated fatty acids, Hughes says. Saturated fat -- found mostly in animal products and in palm and coconut oils -- is the main dietary cause of high blood cholesterol, according to the American Heart Association.
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