I can tackle coconut oil and avocado just fine. But there was one thing about the next two weeks that was looming over me: the intermittent fasting (IF) Dr. Axe built into his program. (Not all keto diets include this.) On Keto360 you can choose from three different eating windows, and I went for the longest: noon to 8 p.m., which meant I wouldn't be eating solid food until midday. I have an active fitness schedule, which needs fuel (and recovery) on a regular basis, so I was concerned I'd really miss my morning yogurt with berries and be left feeling hangry by 10 a.m. (Not to mention, some food pros feel the potential benefits of intermittent fasting might not be worth the risks.) Dr. Axe assured me that not only could I handle the IF, but that temporarily starving the body this way will allow it to heal. "When you're fasting for a period of time, you're essentially letting the systems of your body completely rest and recover." And he's right. This is exactly why sleep is the most important thing for weight loss and health, why there are such things as beauty night creams, and why rest days are crucial to meeting any fitness goal. The breaking down of food, the rapid turnover of cells, and the repairing of muscle tears all happen during rest.
In the famous Lyon Diet Heart Study, people who had heart attacks between 1988 and 1992 were either counseled to follow the standard post-heart attack diet advice, which reduces saturated fat greatly, or told to follow a Mediterranean style. After about four years, follow-up results showed that people on the Mediterranean diet experienced 70 percent less heart disease — which is about three times the reduction in risk achieved by most cholesterol-lowering prescription station drugs! The people on the Mediterranean diet also amazingly experienced a 45 percent lower risk of all-cause death than the group on the standard low-fat diet. (11)
hey Julius, love your blog and dirtyweights.com … im two weeks into keto and really seeing some great results..but i would liek to know what is the optimal calorie intake and macro split ishould be doing. im 31, 6 feet 2, at 195 lbs. ive put on muslce for the past year and want to burn body fat from what i am now (approx 21% fat) to ideally 15% or lower in next 6 weeks. what would you suggest?
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I've been doing the keto diet for a couple of years now, and there's one thing I can tell you: the longer you follow it, the more benefits you get! It also gets much easier! That's because, once your body is fat adapted for a long period of time, it get's easier to get back into ketosis. You simply need to train your body to do it. Once you've been fat adapted for a few months, you can even add a few carbohydrates back into your diet from time to time. So understand that you aren't saying goodbye to carbs forever, you are just getting smarter about how to use them! For more go to http://www.easyketomealplan.org/
If you've been cooking with vegetable oil or coconut oil, make the switch to extra-virgin olive oil. Olive oil is rich in monounsaturated fatty acids which may improve HDL cholesterol, the "good" type of cholesterol. HDL cholesterol ferries "bad" LDL particles out of arteries, according to a 2017 study in Circulation. Use olive oil in homemade salad dressings and vinaigrettes. Drizzle it on finished dishes like fish or chicken to boost flavor. Swap butter for olive oil in mashed potatoes, pasta, and more.
The high-grade extra virgin olive oil contains around 30 polyphenols that act as antioxidants and reduce inflammation in the body. The monounsaturated fatty acids in extra virgin olive oil help increase HDL (“good”) cholesterol while decreasing LDL (“bad”) cholesterol. Plus, the additional antioxidants have been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease.

Because this is an eating pattern – not a structured diet – you're on your own to figure out how many calories you should eat to lose or maintain your weight, what you'll do to stay active and how you'll shape your Mediterranean menu. The Mediterranean diet pyramid should help get you started. The pyramid emphasizes eating fruits, veggies, whole grains, beans, nuts, legumes, olive oil, and flavorful herbs and spices; fish and seafood at least a couple of times a week; and poultry, eggs, cheese and yogurt in moderation, while saving sweets and red meat for special occasions. Top it off with a splash of red wine (if you want), remember to stay physically active and you're set.
You can eat what you love. It’s evident that with such a variety of whole, fresh foods available to you as options, it’s easy to build meals based on the diet. And, you don’t have to eliminate your favorites, either. They may just require some tweaks. For instance, rather than a sausage and pepperoni pizza, you’d choose one piled high with veggies and topped with some cheese. You can also fit in a lot of food into one meal. Filling up on fresh foods like fruits and vegetables will allow you to build volume into meals for fewer calories.

The health benefits of the Mediterranean diet are evident from both a medical and holistic perspective. While weight loss is not the primary intent of this diet, it’s an inherent effect from eating more plant-based foods while curbing sugar and red meat. Additionally, the high-fiber content of many whole grains, vegetables, fruits, and legumes found in the Mediterranean diet will help you feel fuller for longer, and reduce the chance of overeating. You’ll also pick up additional perks such as better digestive health and effective weight management. A Mediterranean diet can also be beneficial to those with type-2 diabetes by helping to lower blood glucose levels while promoting good HDL (high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol. Lastly, studies have also shown a link between the Mediterranean diet and long-term brain health. These health perks, combined with increased exercise and leisure-time, help earn the Mediterranean diet its reputation as a well rounded, logical, and realistic way to live.
A randomized control study in 2017 examined the effects of a ketogenic diet combined with Crossfit training on body composition and performance. Results from this study concluded that subjects following a low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (LCKD) significantly decreased body weight, body fat percentage and fat mass compared to those in the control group[*].
Julius thanks for the reply. I am usually asleep anywhere between 9-10pm. I usually eat dinner early between 5 and 6. Work out at about 7:30(after we put our daughter to sleep Mon, Wed, Fri). I drink caffeine in the mornings. I have a full gym in my garage where I do light weight until fatigue(or close to it) for 3 sets one after the other Bench, Squat, Barbell Rows, Military, and RDL with about a two and a half minute in between. When I am done I usually throw in some auxillaries.. curls, tri’s, etc.. I was thinking of adding HIIT on off days(sprints on treadmill, jump rope). Thank you again!
"I work in a really corporate environment where there's often donuts and cupcakes around. My coworkers say, 'Nobody will know if you just a have a cupcake,' but I will know! It’s not about beating the system or sneaking in cheat meals. I know the food is going to make me feel bad all day and it's not worth it to me. There’s always a line of people at the coffee machine at 2 o’clock in the afternoon because they’re all so tired after lunch."
The results in body fat percentage lost was even more striking. The average body mass percentage decreased by 2.9% in the Atkins diet group. In contrast, it decreased by 1.5% in the Ornish diet group, by 1.3% in the Zone diet group, and 1.0% in the LEARN diet group. [16] This means that subjects in the Atkins diets decreased their average body fat percentage at least twice of any other group- including those eating the low-fat, high carbohydrate Ornish diet.
I would love to see some before and after pics… High intensity biking/running or any cardio for long periods of time can raise your cortisol levels, spiking your insulin whilst putting you in a catabolic state… Your body is eating away at your muscles by converting dietary protein into glucose. The physical stress from extreme cardio sends “stress signals” throughout your body forcing it to look for additional energy. Your hormonal systems interpret this energy as glucose. It’s like when you watch the Olympics, long distance runners look skinny and sick whilst “short distance sprinters” look thick and muscular… HIIT training or moderate cardio is the way to go if you want to spare muscle mass…

The Mediterranean diet is not a low-fat diet. Fat is actually encouraged, but only healthy varieties such as monounsaturated fat from olive oil and polyunsaturated fat (specifically omega-3 fatty acids) from certain fish and shellfish. Unhealthy fats such as trans fats and saturated fats, which are often found in processed foods and red meat, are discouraged. While the Mediterranean diet is strongly plant-based, it is not exclusively vegetarian. Fish, shellfish, and a little poultry are welcome, but they should never trump whole grains, fruits, vegetables, or legumes in a meal.


Hi julius, my name is gabby, in. High school i was 5’0 125-128 but was solid. Was a cheerleader/gymnast, i also was a thrower on track & had always lifted weights, fastforward early 20s i became a long distance runner which i found to be theraputic. I was the skinniest i had ever been, i then became pregnant had my son by emergecy c-section… I nursed & was extremely thin everywhere but where it mattered, once nursing stopped my weight ballooned& everything ive ever known of dieting & working out has not helped me. I work overnights so im concerned about the sleep aspect as i dont get much during my 5 night work week & 2kids.. HELP! Ideally id love to lose 30lbs… Not afraid of diet or excercise! Guidance please!! Sorry for the novel!

Dr. Hallberg notes that it is easy to over-consume fat in liquids, especially full fat whipping cream. “Someone will come in and say they are in a weight loss plateau. We will look at their diet and see they are consuming six coffees, with two tablespoons of whipping cream in each one.” Cutting back on the whipping cream can get them out of a stall.

Yet it’s an incredibly well-rounded way to lose weight that ditches gimmicks and doesn’t require calorie or macronutrient counting as other diets do. And with the emphasis on healthy fat, it’s satisfying, too. That said, the 2019 U.S. News & World Report Best Diets ranked the Mediterranean diet as No. 1 for Best Diets Overall and it ranks 17 in their list of Best Weight-Loss Diets. (3) The reviewers note that it’s not a slam dunk, and all depends on how you eat. Even healthy diets like the Mediterranean aren’t free-for-all eating plans.
Since MCTs are processed in the liver, they are absorbed quickly and provide fast and sustained energy. MCTs move passively via the hepatic portal system to the liver without the need for a longer digestive process. Unlike almost all other foods, MCTs do not require energy to be absorbed, stored or used in the body, making them an almost perfect source of natural energy.
Neither protein nor carbohydrate triggers the production of chylomicrons. Only long-chain fatty acids do, which are what the vast majority of all naturally occurring fats and oils are made up of. More LPS and chylomicrons may help explain the unique role of dietary fat in raising CRP and other inflammatory substances in the blood, as researchers from the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, and Edinburgh University, Edinburgh, discussed. (9)
In the short term, you may lose a modest amount of weight over a year span and are likely to keep it off it you continue to eat following the diet. (6) If eating in the Mediterranean style prompts you to consume more fruits and vegetables, you’ll not only feel better physically, but your mental health will get a lift, too. Research shows that people who eat more raw fruits and veggies (particularly dark leafy greens like spinach, fresh berries, and cucumber) have fewer symptoms of depression, a better mood, and more life satisfaction. (36)
The traditional diets of countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea differ slightly so there are different versions of the Mediterranean diet. However, in 1993 the Harvard School of Public Health, Oldways Preservation and Exchange Trust, and the European Office of the World Health Organization introduced the Mediterranean Diet Pyramid as a guide to help familiarize people with the most common foods of the region. More of an eating pattern than a strictly regimented diet plan, the pyramid emphasized certain foods based on the dietary traditions of Crete, Greece, and southern Italy during the mid-20th century. [1,2] At that time, these countries displayed low rates of chronic disease and higher than average adult life expectancy despite having limited access to healthcare. It was believed that the diet—mainly fruits and vegetables, beans, nuts, whole grains, fish, olive oil, small amounts of dairy, and red wine—contributed to their health benefits. The pyramid also highlighted daily exercise and the beneficial social aspects of eating meals together.

“MCTs” are medium-chain triglycerides, a form of saturated fatty acid that has numerous health benefits, ranging from improved cognitive function to better weight management. Coconut oil is one great source of MCTs — roughly 62 percent to 65 percent of the fatty acids in coconut oil are MCTs — but recently more concentrated “MCT oil” has also been growing in popularity.


Finally, watch your protein intake, it’s very easy to go over on that and excess protein will be converted to sugars in your body (so it’s fine if you work out a lot but if you don’t then just be aware and don’t go overboard). It’s practically impossible to eat too much good fats (avoid trans fats like the plague and try to limit polyunsaturated too as too much of them can promote inflammation in the body and unfortunately they’re in lots of stuff), fats are so satieting though that you’ll nearly always feel way too full before you can eat too much of them (provided the food that they’re in isn’t secretly hiding carbs and protein too, I.e. be careful with the kind of nuts you eat, macadamia only have 5 grams of carbs per 100g but cashews have 20+ so a couple big handfuls of those will nearly knock you out of ketosis like that!)
In 2013, a landmark study of more than 7,000 people in Spain was published. The study’s subjects were split into three groups: those receiving advice about following a Mediterranean diet and getting extra-virgin olive oil delivered to their home; receiving advice about following the Mediterranean diet and getting nuts delivered to their home; and, in the control group, receiving advice about following a low-fat diet.
As the tide began to turn in the early 2000s and the claims for low-fat diets grew more dubious, new dietary culprits were called into question, such as refined carbohydrates and gluten. Meanwhile, more research emerged exploring the benefits of diets rich in healthy fats. These days, Flynn is noted for seemingly having known before others that low-fat diets were not optimal for health. “I constantly hear from people now ‘How did you know low-fat diets were unhealthy?’ ” She laughs this off remarking that she would simply always read the references supporting dietary guidelines and was a critical reviewer of the evidence. “I constantly tell my students to not take dietary guidelines at face value; look into the evidence.”
What can you eat on an anti-inflammatory diet? People with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) may wish to follow an anti-inflammatory diet to reduce the painful inflammation that this condition causes. There are many healthful anti-inflammatory recipes available for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks in between. Learn more about following an anti-inflammatory diet here. Read now
When it comes to eating a healthy diet, olive oil is your best friend. It tastes delicious, it's full of healthy, good-for-your-heart fats, and it might even help fight off dangerous belly bugs. But there’s another way this golden health elixir can make your life better—and you don't even need to eat it. Simply smelling olive oil may help you lose weight, according to a recent study in the American Journal of Nutrition.
The retention and need for a diuretic in the past may have been from excessive carb/wheat/dairy intake… Something you may find resolves with a ketogenic diet. Decreasing iodized salt and increasing sea salt, especially himilayian pink salt might help you to maintain sodium levels without the fluid retention effects also. For example I always buy unsalted butter and add pink salt for the flavour/sodium component. It’s made a big difference for me (a fellow massive found retainer haha)
Julius thanks for sharing your story with us and the great breakdown of everything. I’m two weeks in on my standard keto diet along with exercise and I feel great. I know how vital sleep is but I find myself waking up very early in the morning usually between 3-4 am(I wake up at 5 for work) but I have so much energy I can’t go back to sleep and I am not tired throughout the day. From your knowledge and experience is this normal? And is working out more than 3x a week counter productive in your opinion? Thanks again, Josh

Olive oil is an integral part of the "Mediterranean diet" which is associated with sensible tasty portions and slower, more enjoyable eating. People who eat a "Mediterranean diet" have been shown to have a remarkable variety of health benefits. The olive oil in the Mediterranean diet can quickly satisfy hunger and lead to fewer total calories ingested at mealtime. It is unclear if any single component of this diet is responsible for these health benefits or if it is a combination of olive oil and a diet high in vegetables, fruit and fish.

Eat less often. It’s much easier to eat fewer calories and maintain higher levels of ketosis when you eat less meals. Instead of snacking throughout the day, try getting all of your calories from 2-3 meals every day. You can also try intermittent fasting by restricting all your meals to an 8-hour eating window. This will allow your blood sugar and insulin to drop down to baseline levels so that your body can go into its fasting state and burn body fat for fuel.
Keto meals seemed so heavy and rich to me, and it just wasn't how I was used to eating. Plus, I consider myself a flexitarian, so the thought of eating more meat-and more often than I typically would-gave me pause. Dr. Axe assured me that even vegetarians could pull off a keto diet if they planned well enough. (Vegans can, too.) That said, he's a proponent of animal products and red meat specifically, because of the iron it provides for women (who are more susceptible to deficiency) and because it can bolster energy when carbs are lacking. (These Are the Other Things Vegetarians Need to Be Aware of Before Going Keto.)
Not only is the Mediterranean diet a tasty way to eat, drink and live, but it’s also a realistic and sustainable way to reduce disease-causing inflammation and to lose weight, too (or to maintain a healthy weight). In fact, in January 2019 when U.S. News evaluated 41 of the most popular diets they identified the Mediterranean Diet as being the “#1 Best Overall Diet.”
Unfortunately, our current food environment is nothing like what the human race initially evolved to handle. Today, we are constantly bombarded with endless processed food options, food ads, and smells that trigger our desires. As a result, the oldest parts of our brain motivate us to hunt for that food, which we now have a 100% chance of getting — and we don’t have to exert much effort at all to get it.

These findings are in line with another meta-analysis on 13 randomized controlled trials lasting at least six months comparing low-fat and low-carbohydrate diets. They noted that at six months, subjects who consumed less than 60 grams of carbohydrates per day had an average greater weight-loss of 8.8 lbs. compared to subjects on low-fat diets. [20] At one year, the difference had fallen to only 2.3 lbs. [20]
To put it another way, the ketogenic diet is one of the best ways to “hack” our brain and food environment so that we naturally eat fewer calories and lose weight. What is even more interesting is that this isn’t the only reason why many people find weight loss success with keto. By restricting carbs, we also unlock the weight loss boosting benefits of ketones.
What is the key to a healthy diet?According to the Harvard Medical School Food Pyramid, the total amount of fat you eat, whether high or low, is not really linked with disease. What really matters is the type of fat you eat. The "bad" fats -- saturated and trans fats -- increase the risk for certain diseases. The "good" fats – mono-unsaturated and poly-unsaturated fats –- like those contained in olive oil lower disease risk. The key to a healthy diet is to substitute good fats for bad fats, and to avoid trans fats.
Starting in Italy thousands of years ago and spreading to Greece, Spain and other areas around the Mediterranean, this diet is now successful all over the world for promoting health and longevity. While it’s always existed, even before books and studies were dedicated to it, the diet really began to take hold around the world in the 1990s, when a Harvard University doctor showcased it as a diet useful for improving heart health, losing weight and clearing up other health issues.
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You have to give yourself time to learn how to feel if you are full or still hungry. And so you do that for each meal, for a week’s time, you realize at some point that you are eating the right amount, you are eating too much, or you are eating too little. You will realize at some meals “I was eating too much. I didn’t need that second egg or whatever.” It is a way to do it without counting calories, to do it based on your body’s need and for you to get in touch with your body’s need.
Our European neighbors have known for many centuries of the many benefits of olive oil — they use it inside the body and out! On the skin, they use it as an exfoliant mixed into a sugar scrub or as a moisturizer. But you don’t have to smear olive oil all over you; drinking it will provide known anti-aging compounds, like antioxidants and vitamin E.

Milk is limited. There are no long-term risks to eating Mediterranean, says Cohen. But you may be put off if you’re big on eating a lot of milk and rely on it to get all the calcium you need. You’ll get to eat cheese and yogurt, but in smaller amounts. "To get enough calcium in the diet without milk, one would need to eat enough yogurt and cheese, or seek nondairy calcium sources," says Cohen. If needed, drink skim milk. Otherwise, nondairy calcium sources include fortified almond milk, sardines, kale, and tofu made with calcium sulfate. (30)
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The go-to protein in the Mediterranean diet is fish. In particular, this diet emphasizes fatty fish like salmon, sardines, and mackerel. These fish are rich in heart- and brain-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Even those fish that are leaner and have less fat (like cod or tilapia) are still worth it, as they provide a good source of protein. If you currently don't get a lot of fish in your diet, an easy point of entry is to designate one day each week as "fish" night. Cooking fish in parchment paper or foil packets is one no-fuss, no-mess way to put dinner on the table. Or try incorporating it in some of your favorite foods, like tacos, stir-frys, and soups.
A study in the Journal of Lipid Research conducted at the University of Kentucky clearly demonstrated in animals that a high-fat diet promoted the absorption from the gut of lipopolysaccharides (LPS), toxic substances that are part of bacterial cell membranes. That’s troubling because high levels of LPS trigger immune cells to increase inflammation. (7)
According to some studies, medium-chain fats offer better protection from infections than longer-chain fatty acids do. A study published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry found that fatty acids and monoglycerides with chain lengths varying from 8–12 carbons were found to be more strongly antiviral and antibacterial when added to milk and formula than long-chain monoglycerides. Medium-chain lipids added to milk (lipid-enhanced milk) and formula inactivated a number of pathogens, including respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), haemophilus influenzae and streptococcus. (10)
Mediterranean diet is a generic term based on the typical eating habits in the countries that border the Mediterranean Sea. Elements include dairy products, fish and poultry being more common than red meat; fruits, vegetables, bread and other cereals, potatoes, beans, nuts and seeds; use of olive oil; wine consumed in low to moderate amounts. These diets have similarities to the American Heart Association's dietary recommendations, except a relatively high percentage of calories in Mediterranean-style diets come from fat.
HDL cholesterol has long been considered “good” because it is largely responsible for picking up excess cholesterol from tissues, including the artery wall, and bringing it back to the liver for disposal. This process is known as reverse cholesterol transport. It’s easy to remember if you think of HDL as the garbage trucks that help rid the body of garbage (LDL).
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Designed for athletes looking for a fast burst of energy, those following a paleo or keto diet and everyone looking to support brain health,† Dr. Formulated MCT Coconut Oil is 100% organic coconut oil and delivers 13g of MCTs—including Caprylic and Capric acids—per serving. MCTs are healthy fatty acids that are easily digested, provide energy and are burned by the body for fuel and energy.†
One of the “hearty healthy” effects of olive oil, argues the olive oil industry, is that it raises levels of HDL good cholesterol. But higher HDL levels do not always mean better arteries. Remember the study on monkeys discussed at the beginning of this article? The higher HDL levels of the monkeys consuming a diet rich in monounsaturated fat did not prevent them from developing plaque–ridden, diseased arteries.

The traditional diets of countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea differ slightly so there are different versions of the Mediterranean diet. However, in 1993 the Harvard School of Public Health, Oldways Preservation and Exchange Trust, and the European Office of the World Health Organization introduced the Mediterranean Diet Pyramid as a guide to help familiarize people with the most common foods of the region. More of an eating pattern than a strictly regimented diet plan, the pyramid emphasized certain foods based on the dietary traditions of Crete, Greece, and southern Italy during the mid-20th century. [1,2] At that time, these countries displayed low rates of chronic disease and higher than average adult life expectancy despite having limited access to healthcare. It was believed that the diet—mainly fruits and vegetables, beans, nuts, whole grains, fish, olive oil, small amounts of dairy, and red wine—contributed to their health benefits. The pyramid also highlighted daily exercise and the beneficial social aspects of eating meals together.
In fact, the FDA now allows olive oil labels to carry the claim that its monounsaturated fat can reduce heart disease risks -- with a few strings attached. The claim says that "limited and not conclusive scientific evidence" suggests that eating about 2 tablespoons of olive oil daily may reduce the risk of heart disease. To give this possible benefit, it adds, the olive oil must replace a similar amount of saturated fat in your diet -- and must not increase the total calories you eat in a day.
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