1. Healthy Grains: Whether enjoyed for breakfast, lunch, or dinner, whole, healthy grains are full of fiber, antioxidants, and anti-inflammatory properties. A 2015 study in JAMA Internal Medicine linked whole grains and lower mortality, especially from chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and type-2 diabetes. Common whole grains include brown rice and oats, while ancient grains such as quinoa, amaranth, farro, buckwheat, and bulgur pack the added perk of being gluten-free.
Doctors and medical professionals in United States are increasingly advocating a Mediterranean diet plan as research uncovers its many health benefits. A groundbreaking 2013 study by the University of Barcelona made the connection between the Mediterranean diet and cardiovascular health strikingly clear. Over 7,000 Spanish participants—many of whom were overweight, smokers, or diabetic—adopted a Mediterranean-style diet rich in healthy fats (olive oil or nuts) for nearly five years. After a comprehensive follow-up, surprised researchers ended the study early after observing a sharp improvement in participants’ health. The findings showed an “absolute risk reduction,” or a 30% decrease of cardiovascular disease among these high-risk individuals. The results, published in the New England Journal of Medicine, made news across the U.S. as evidence enough that everyone, from high-risk to healthy individuals, can benefit by eating Mediterranean diet foods.

Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) are fats that are naturally found in coconut and palm kernel oils. They’re more easily and rapidly digested than other types of fats. MCTs are readily absorbed from the GI tract and are metabolized very quickly by the liver, where they are reported to encourage the use of fat for energy rather than for storage.* Numerous studies suggest that substituting MCT oil for other fats in a healthy diet may therefore help to support healthy weight and body composition.*
Sleep is good – cpap makes sure of that 🙂 Health issues are arthritis, high LDL ( think that will go away once I loose lots of weight, family history though). I try to track nutrients and I know I need to do better but I am pretty sure I am getting enough fats and calories but the pen and paper will tell for sure. This morning I am making a egg,spinach, mushroom, cheese & bacon in a large cupcake holder so I know how much I put in each. Stress….. I am a nurse, some of my high need patients are really tugging on my emotions and dealing with the ones who want their “pain meds” grrrr but overall I work for a great Dr in a great office so I am lucky, home life is great, could use some more money – lol who couldn’t – but have an ex who I guess I still have some pstd (20 yrs is hard) but still working on it – my last son is a senior in high school so won’t have to deal with the ex too much longer.
Results, she promises, can be quite dramatic. And sure enough, Woman’s World readers who tested Palinski-Wade’s olive oil diet menus melted up to eight pounds and four inches of ab flab in just seven days. “I tried Weight Watchers, supplements, fad diets, but nothing worked until this,” says Pennsylvania grandmother Eleanor Downing, 62. “I lost a pant size in a week!” Meanwhile, Colorado travel agent Erika Crocker, 47, who whisked four inches off her middle, still can’t believe such a simple approach could be so effective. As for 30-year-old Mississippi mom Lindsey Bradley, 30, dropping a size has her raving: “For once, my belly got flatter without hunger pangs.”
Indeed, the people most likely to live 100 robust years and beyond, the citizens of Okinawa, Japan, don’t even use olive oil. They do eat a lot of fiber–rich, straight–from–the–earth foods, (14) as do other communities with high percentages of centenarians, such as the Seventh Day Adventists of Loma Linda, California; and the people of Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica; Icaria, Greece; and Sardinia, Italy. (15)

All olive oils are not the same, however. This book also explores the effects of diverse varieties of olives, growing techniques and oil-production methods on the health-giving properties - and flavour - of different oils. With over 100 delicious recipes, it points the way to those extra virgin oils and food combinations that are likely to do you the most good.


Plagued by pimples? You may start to notice a difference in your skin on the keto diet, especially if you were a former sugar addict. Consuming lots of empty carbs is linked to worse acne—in part because these foods trigger inflammation and signal the release of hormones that up the production of pore-clogging oils, according to a review published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Some findings suggest that curbing your carb intake could help solve these problems, improving your skin as a result.

Healthy fats like olive oil and nuts, plus plenty of anti-inflammatory veggies and fruits, are known to fight age-related cognitive decline. These help counter the harmful effects of exposure to toxicity, free radicals, inflammation-causing poor diets or food allergies, which can all contribute to impaired brain function. This is one reason why adherence to the Mediterranean diet is linked with lower rates of Alzheimer’s. (10)
Getting adequate amounts of vitamins is extremely important to support healthy weight loss and overall wellness. Taking a multivitamin with synthetic ingredients has been shown to be ineffective and a complete waste of money[*]. Alternatively, consuming a high-quality greens powder made from real, nutritious whole foods rich in vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, fiber and phytonutrients is a much better way to optimize health and longevity. Check out this article for more information on supplementing with a high quality, effective greens powder.
Olive oil contains biophenols, which suppress the oxidization of LDL (or “bad cholesterol”) which has been shown to play a role in the development of cardiovascular disease. High levels of LDL in the blood amplify oxidative stress which hardens the arterial walls (called atherosclerosis). The biophenols in olives reduce blood pressure, therefore reducing the development of arterial plaque as well.
In 2017, Drs. Kevin Hall and Juen Guo published a meta-analysis of controlled feeding studies that compared diets of equal calorie and protein content with variations in carbohydrate and fat content. By designing the study in this way, the researchers could finally find out whether restricting carbs or limiting calories is more important when it comes to weight loss.
“The eating style with the most impressive evidence to support its health benefits is the Mediterranean diet. However, this is not the American version of the Mediterranean diet, which tends to be heavy on pasta, pizza and meat. Instead, it's the traditional peasant Mediterranean diet, whose followers could not afford refined sugar, processed foods, butter and meats. Instead, they grew and ate their own vegetables and berries, and tended orchards of olives, nuts, and fruits. They fished the seas and rivers for their protein, which was rich in omega-3 fats. They consumed modest amounts of fermented dairy such as yogurt and cheese. Many of them during their largest meal of the day would enjoy a glass of red wine from their own vineyards. This diet and lifestyle has been proven in many large studies to be the healthiest eating pattern in the world; and it helps that it is delicious as well as nutritious.”
We will then act out our ancestral programming by eating the most calorie dense foods (i.e., pizza, french fries, cookies, cakes, etc.) and eating much more of those foods then what our body needs to energize itself until the next meal. This results in a vicious cycle of overeating and weight gain with the subconscious intention to prepare us for famine — famine that never comes.
And monounsaturated fat isn't the only thing olive oil has going for it nutritionally. Some olive oils come with phytonutrients that may offer their own disease protection benefits (still, it's not clear whether most of us can take in enough of these phytonutrients without going overboard on olive oil, says Joyce Nettleton, DSc, RD, researcher and editor of the PUFA Newsletter).
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