Eating like a Mediterranean is as much lifestyle as it is diet. Instead of gobbling your meal in front of the TV, slow down and sit down at the table with your family and friends to savor what you’re eating. Not only will you enjoy your company and your food, eating slowly allows you to tune in to your body’s hunger and fullness signals. You’re more apt to eat just until you’re satisfied than until you’re busting-at-the-seams full.
The “PREDIMED” study, published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2013 conclusively showed that the Mediterranean diet group had a third less heart disease, diabetes and stroke than the low-fat group. They also lost a little weight and had less memory loss. The most recent results showed that it also reduced chances of breast cancer, albeit in a small number of women.
Flynn had always had an interest in dietary guidelines and how various diet patterns impact weight and disease risk. She was especially intrigued after having read the Seven Countries Study in the mid-1980s that demonstrated notable cardiovascular benefits from what is now widely known as the Mediterranean Diet, in which individuals consume considerable amounts of healthy fats, especially olive oil. Flynn had also spent time analyzing the literature behind dietary guidelines and recommendations and was “astounded” by the lack of evidence supporting the health claims made by proponents of low-fat diets. She went on to co-author a book, Low-Fat Lies (Lifeline Press, 1999), drawing on the scientific evidence revealing the numerous problems with extremely low-fat diets and demonstrating the positive effects of a more Mediterranean-style eating pattern.
I weigh approx. 200 lbs 5’10” tall woman. I would have 3 eggs and 1 tbls butter for breakfast, than for lunch a shake: spinach, flax seeds, chia seeds, 1 tbls coconut oil, avocado, lemon. Snack: a keto bar http://www.ketobars.com/ and dinner: some green veggies with a salmon or steak. I use myfitnesspal for calorie counting and set my daily calorie goals at 1200, with 85% fat, 10% protein and 5% carbs. Out of that I would have 81g of fat, 36g protein and 22g carbs. Does that look like a good plan for keto diet? I would appreciate your help on this. Thank you in advance!
Fat is a macronutrient with many benefits, one of which is the absorption of fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K. It is also a building block of every cell membrane in the body. It provides energy, slows the absorption of other nutrients (so you feel full longer after a meal) and is required for healthy liver function. Plus, let’s face it, fat makes food taste better.
Flynn proved the success of a diet that’s high in healthy fats in 2010 with a study of 44 women over 50 who’d become overweight during breast cancer treatment. Each woman trialled two eight-week diets: Flynn’s olive oil-based diet and a low-fat food plan as recommended by the US National Cancer Institute. Both diets were made up of 1500 calories a day.
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