Research suggests that the benefits of following a Mediterranean-style eating pattern may be many: improved weight loss, better control of blood glucose (sugar) levels and reduced risk of depression, to name a few. Eating like a Mediterranean has also been associated with reduced levels of inflammation, a risk factor for heart attack, stroke and Alzheimer’s disease.

L-glutamine is an amino acid with many functions in your body including acting as a powerful antioxidant[*][*]. Research shows that L-glutamine can help stabilize blood glucose levels[*] and has been recommended to help reduce sugar cravings. Supplementing with L-glutamine (about ½-1 teaspoon powdered form or 500 mg dose) may help in reducing carb/sugar cravings and aid in your ketogenic weight-loss journey.
“The general body of research says that once you have two or more tablespoons a day, you’ll improve your blood pressure, your glucose levels and your good cholesterol,” Flynn says. “But I’ve found that the weight-loss effect comes into play at three tablespoons, so that’s what I recommend. It’s an amazing food – it does all these things that help your body, plus it tastes good.”
In 2007, a team of eight research scientists compared the impact of the Atkins diet on body mass and body fat with three other diets in a 12-month randomized controlled trial. The team recruited 311 overweight and obese, premenopausal women with no history of diabetes or cardiovascular diseases. The women had an average age of 41 years, BMI of 32, and body fat percentage of 40. After taking baseline measurements, researchers distributed the subjects to one of four different groups.
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“The eating style with the most impressive evidence to support its health benefits is the Mediterranean diet. However, this is not the American version of the Mediterranean diet, which tends to be heavy on pasta, pizza and meat. Instead, it's the traditional peasant Mediterranean diet, whose followers could not afford refined sugar, processed foods, butter and meats. Instead, they grew and ate their own vegetables and berries, and tended orchards of olives, nuts, and fruits. They fished the seas and rivers for their protein, which was rich in omega-3 fats. They consumed modest amounts of fermented dairy such as yogurt and cheese. Many of them during their largest meal of the day would enjoy a glass of red wine from their own vineyards. This diet and lifestyle has been proven in many large studies to be the healthiest eating pattern in the world; and it helps that it is delicious as well as nutritious.”
It's more than just Greek and Italian cuisine. Look for recipes from Spain, Turkey, Morocco, and other countries. Choose foods that stick to the basics: light on red meat and whole-fat dairy, with lots of fresh fruits and veggies, olive oil, and whole grains. This Moroccan recipe with chickpeas, okra, and spices fits the healthy Mediterranean profile.
“The general body of research says that once you have two or more tablespoons a day, you’ll improve your blood pressure, your glucose levels and your good cholesterol,” Flynn says. “But I’ve found that the weight-loss effect comes into play at three tablespoons, so that’s what I recommend. It’s an amazing food – it does all these things that help your body, plus it tastes good.”
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