While most people in the Mediterranean aren’t vegetarians, the diet promotes only a small consumption on meats and heavier meals — instead going for the lighter and healthier fish options across the board. This can be beneficial for those looking to lose weight and improve things such as their cholesterol, heart health and omega-3 fatty acid intake.

It’s confusing because coconut oil marketers imply that lauric acid is the same as monolaurin, an extremely potent antimicrobial that is derived from lauric acid. (They are not the same…I used monolaurin when I had candida years ago, and depending on your gut bacteria, you may create monolaurin in your gut when you eat affordable coconut oil.) Given how common and cheap this stuff is, it’s no wonder that companies are tempted to sell it as a true MCT. Two years ago, I looked into making a more affordable MCT oil containing lauric acid. I’d have made a killing selling what is basically coconut oil as something special, but it simply doesn’t work, and it’s not truthful marketing. #notgonnahappen
Metagenics MCT Oil provides over 90% caprylic (C8) and capric (C10) acid triglycerides. Emerging science suggests that medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) may benefit the body in numerous ways. MCT may help support cognitive health and certain cognitive processes, and pre-clinical research suggests that MCT may benefit mitochondrial function. MCT supplementation temporarily increases levels of ketones, which may serve as an alternative energy source in the brain and in muscle. Supplementing with MCT at multiple meals during the day may aid reductions in body weight and body fat, especially in those with an increased body-mass index (BMI).†† MCT may also help to temporarily increase satiety and reduce food intake, and may temporarily enhance fat oxidation as compared to common long-chain fats.*
Another thing that's worked for me: holding myself accountable on Instagram. Since starting the keto diet back in 2017, I've religiously posted photos of my progress. Seeing those photos shows me how far I've come, and it helps inspire those starting their own weight-loss journeys—learning about people who I've touched also inspires me to keep moving forward with my goals.
A perfect plate reflecting the Mediterranean diet is nutritionally balanced, diverse, and full of color, flavor, and texture. It’s crisp, leafy greens; deep purple grapes; ruby-red salmon; vibrant rainbow carrots; and nutty, crunchy farro. It’s Greek yogurt topped with figs, dates, and a drizzle of honey. Is your mouth watering? That’s exactly the point—the Mediterranean diet should never feel restrictive. Instead, it’s an enlightened way of eating defined by plant-based foods such as vegetables, fruits, healthy grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds.
Unsaturated fatty acids, whether monounsaturated or polyunsaturated, can lower your levels of "bad" cholesterol (which decreases your risk of heart disease) if you eat them instead of saturated fatty acids, Hughes says. Saturated fat -- found mostly in animal products and in palm and coconut oils -- is the main dietary cause of high blood cholesterol, according to the American Heart Association.
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