“Certainly, a single high-fat meal has been shown to impair blood flow in part because of acute damage to the endothelium, which may explain why angina is often much worse for several hours after each high-fat meal. A vital question scientists must ask is: ‘How much inflammatory damage do dietary fats cause, and, as a result, how much cardiovascular disease are they causing’?”

I’ve been playing with the idea of a keto diet for a few months, at over 300lb I need to make some big changes. I think my biggest concern atm is being unable to exercise. Due to my size it is painful so the only work out i really get is taking my dog for a walk. I guess I’m a little scared that eating high fat whilst not doing much exercise will have an adverse effect.

If you want to incorporate elements of the Mediterranean diet into your life, Weems recommends starting by adding more fruits and vegetables. “The recommendation is to get around nine servings of produce a day, and most people aren’t reaching that number,” she says. “If you’re drinking wine and eating olive oil but you’re not adding the fruit and veggies, you’re not getting the most important benefits.”


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Hi Julius, I’ve just started keto and I’m losing weight at a great rate so far. My blood pressure is still high. Did your blood pressure ever go down. Mine goes down sometimes other times it’s back up again. I have been on this diet about 3 weeks now. I don’t know if maybe I should wait longer for results. I wanted to try keto before getting on the meds. Please respond

Starting in Italy thousands of years ago and spreading to Greece, Spain and other areas around the Mediterranean, this diet is now successful all over the world for promoting health and longevity. While it’s always existed, even before books and studies were dedicated to it, the diet really began to take hold around the world in the 1990s, when a Harvard University doctor showcased it as a diet useful for improving heart health, losing weight and clearing up other health issues.
Unsaturated fatty acids, whether monounsaturated or polyunsaturated, can lower your levels of "bad" cholesterol (which decreases your risk of heart disease) if you eat them instead of saturated fatty acids, Hughes says. Saturated fat -- found mostly in animal products and in palm and coconut oils -- is the main dietary cause of high blood cholesterol, according to the American Heart Association.
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