I’m in the process of creating a workout guide as I had the same issue when I started… I Just could find anything on exercising in ketosis… I was losing muscle mass when I was doing a 7 day split…lol… Basically you want to work each muscle group at least twice a week. Workout with medium to heavey loads between 8-12 reps. I also bike 20 miles a day but it’s casual, not sprinting…lol… Cardio isn’t really necessary as it can raise your cortisol levels if it’s to extreme and kick you out of ketosis… You definitely want muscle contraction thought… I will update this post with more information… Good question!
Current lifestyle — Sleep, nutrition, and activity level are all key factors when it comes to weight loss. The more drastic the changes in these areas, the more likely you are to witness dramatic changes in your weight. In other words, if you currently eat healthy, get plenty of sleep, and are moderately active, you will lose weight on keto, but it won’t be as fast or as drastic as someone who isn’t eating healthy, getting enough sleep, or exercising.
Many dieters shy away from nuts because of their high calorie and fat count. But studies show that eating a handful several times a week can prevent heart disease and ultimately help you shed pounds since they fill you up and stop you from snacking on other things. Almonds, in particular, contain lots of monounsaturated fats and fiber. (Healthy swap: Replace peanut butter with almond butter.)
During my honeymoon to Greece I had the chance to visit the oldest-known olive oil tree in the world. Most olive trees can live more than 500 years, but this one is at least 2,000 years old! Given that Greeks consume 12.8 kilograms of olive oil per year — compared to four kilograms in North America — it got me thinking about the importance of these trees to their daily life. Greece’s increased consumption of this healthy fat shows why the Mediterranean diet has been linked to a reduced risk of heart disease and lowered cancer risk for those who follow it.
How much olive oil should you consume daily? While recommendations differ depending on your specific calorie needs and diet, anywhere from one to four tablespoons seems to be beneficial. Estimates show that those in the Mediterranean region probably consume between three to four tablespoons a day, and this is the amount that some health practitioners recommend to their heart disease patients.
When you want to add some carbs to a workout, you can follow the targeted ketogenic diet. You’re allowed a few extra carbs, but they are only on the days and around the timings of your workouts. The focus is on still getting the exercise without struggling with energy. You wouldn’t need to do this if you get enough fat into your diet and once your body gets into the ketone producing zone.
Research supports the health benefits of a Mediterranean-style eating pattern that includes several different foods. It is the combination of these foods that appear protective against disease, as the benefit is not as strong when looking at single foods or nutrients included in the Mediterranean diet. [12] Therefore it is important to not simply add olive oil or nuts to one’s current diet but to adopt the plan in its entirety.
Concentrated MCT oils are often derived from “a blend of coconut and palm oils.” I personally always look for MCT oils sourced only from coconut oil  or sustainable and rainforest friendly palm oil because the palm oil industry is responsible for the deforestation for large parts of the rainforest. Thousands of acres of rainforest are being destroyed to make room for palm production. This has also driven many animals out of their natural habitats and greatly threatens species like the orangutan and Sumatran tiger, which are both in danger of extinction.
On the other hand, coconut oil does have some well-documented health benefits that concentrated MCT oils might be lacking. The biggest drawback to buying manufactured MCT oil is that you might not really know what you’re getting. In order to produce a liquid MCT oil that does not become solid at colder temps, it might need to be more refined than regular coconut oil.
And monounsaturated fat isn't the only thing olive oil has going for it nutritionally. Some olive oils come with phytonutrients that may offer their own disease protection benefits (still, it's not clear whether most of us can take in enough of these phytonutrients without going overboard on olive oil, says Joyce Nettleton, DSc, RD, researcher and editor of the PUFA Newsletter).
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