I’m so very happy I found your page! I was on the ketogenic diet a couple of years ago and there wasn’t much information back then as there is now. I followed the diet and lost 25 lbs but fast forward to today Im 17 lbs heavier so I’m back on it again but this time I’m concerned because unlike before I wasn’t working out at all! I now train 6 times a week. I’m not skinny but I do consider myself a fit person and run 5k’s, obstacle course races and now training for my first CrossFit competition but I felt a devastating hit to my performance this week. I mean I know it’s normal to be weak and fatigued in the beginning but I’m not so sure if keto is the best diet for me now that my goal is to perform for these OCR and drop weight while still building muscles. Any advise for me?
As well as being a full time GP, Dr Simon Poole is a renowned international commentator on the Mediterranean Diet and a member of the Council of Directors of the True Health Initiative in the USA. He has written regularly on matters related to primary care in medicine and nutrition for a diverse range of national media including The Guardian, Nutrition and Food Science and the Journal of the Royal College of Surgeons as well as consumer magazines such as Cook Vegetarian and Body Language. He also has extensive experience broadcasting and writing for local, national and international radio, television and web based organisations and regularly speaks at and chairs conferences attended by physicians, the media, politicians and the food industry on subject matters relating to health, politics and nutrition.

I really enjoyed your article. I do have a couple questions (sorry if I missed the answers in any of the comments above), how would someone calculate their personal macros? At 5’1″ female, I am not going to consume the same amount of food you do so I would think my macros would be considerably less than 150 – 200 grams of fat and so on a day? I am in week 3 and really haven’t lost much. I dropped just over 3 lbs the first week, less than 1 the 2nd week and not sure this week as I weigh on Mondays. Also, did you have to make any adjustments for heavy lifting days?


On a less serious (but still important) note, it is important to start using MCT oil slowly. Because it is so readily and quickly used by the body, it can lead to all kinds of (temporary but embarrassing) digestive disturbances if you jump in to quickly. I’ve even stumbled across entire threads in online forums bemoaning the “disaster pants” that resulted from using too much MCT oil too quickly. It is generally considered safe to start with 1/2 to 1 teaspoon and work up as the stomach permits.
Nuts are another Mediterranean diet staple. Grabbing a handful, whether that's almonds, cashews, or pistachios, can make for a satisfying, on-the-go snack. One study in Nutrition Journal found that if people replaced their standard snack (cookies, chips, crackers, snack mix, cereal bars) with almonds, their diets would be lower in empty calories, added sugar, and sodium. Plus, nuts contain more fiber and minerals, such as potassium, than processed snack foods.
In the short term, you may lose a modest amount of weight over a year span and are likely to keep it off it you continue to eat following the diet. (6) If eating in the Mediterranean style prompts you to consume more fruits and vegetables, you’ll not only feel better physically, but your mental health will get a lift, too. Research shows that people who eat more raw fruits and veggies (particularly dark leafy greens like spinach, fresh berries, and cucumber) have fewer symptoms of depression, a better mood, and more life satisfaction. (36)

Try stress reduction techniques: Examine the stresses in your life and see if you can do anything to alleviate any of them. Stress increases cortisol release. But don’t stress about stress — that is no win. Many women during menopause find they are caught in the sandwich of still dependent children but aging or ill parents. Death of loved ones and loss are common during the menopausal years.
I have been on the Keto diet for approximately 2 months. I have lost 18 lbs, but have about 20 more to lose. I definitely notice certain foods, even tho they are Keto friendly stall my weight loss. I am feeling a lot better about myself already and don’t see a reason why I won’t be able to stick with this diet. However, I am stressing about what I will eat on Thanksgiving being that my family does not follow my same eating habits.
Fish, dairy products and grass-fed/free-range meats contain healthy fatty acids that the body needs, working to help you feel full, manage weight gain, control blood sugar, and improve your mood and energy levels. But if you’re more of a plant-based eater, legumes and whole grains (especially if they’re soaked and sprouted) also make good, filling choices.
Polyphenols are antioxidant plant compounds that are linked with better heart health, including less oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is a process that inflames the arteries and heightens the risk of plaque rupture and heart attacks. Plant sterols are another plant chemical that interferes with cholesterol absorption from the gut and helps lower LDL cholesterol.
So don’t reward olive oil with the laurels, agreed Dr. Alice Lichtenstein, one of the nation’s top nutrition scientists, at the Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tuft University in Boston. In several interviews about this study of Greek adults, she said, “If the main message that Americans get is to just increase their olive or canola oil consumption, that’s unfortunate because they will increase their caloric intake and they are already getting too many calories.
I lost most of my weight on a high protein, low carb diet prescribed by my surgeon, but I’ve recently started the Deeper State Keto program which is much higher fat. I’ve cut out the protein bars and shakes and have so much energy. I feel like I could do cartwheels at all times. It’s not like I felt bad before. I wasn’t sleepy, lethargic, or sluggish. Now, I’m alert, bright and energized all the time."
It’s also crucial, if you’re eating more fats, to make sure you eat the right kinds. A study published last year in Lancet Public Health of 15,428 adults found that low-carb diets were linked with a higher risk of dying during the study period if people replaced carbs with animal-based fats and protein. But those who replaced carbs with fat and protein from plants—such as avocados, olive oil, nuts, and seeds—had a lower risk of dying.  
First, start with a tablespoon and increase the amount over time. Another option is to mix olive oil in a blender with a cup of warm water and the juice of a lemon. It makes it much more palatable and the lemon juice will help with the easier digestion of the oil. Plus, lemon juice has been linked to improved liver function. A healthy liver produces more bile, which in turn is needed for the proper breakdown of fats (and oils) in the small intestine.
Fact: The food is a huge part of the diet, yes, but don’t overlook the other ways the Mediterraneans live their lives. When they sit down for a meal, they don’t sit in front of a television or eat in a rush; they sit down for a relaxed, leisurely meal with others, which may be just as important for your health as what’s on your plate. Mediterraneans also enjoy plenty of physical activity.
In fact, the FDA now allows olive oil labels to carry the claim that its monounsaturated fat can reduce heart disease risks -- with a few strings attached. The claim says that "limited and not conclusive scientific evidence" suggests that eating about 2 tablespoons of olive oil daily may reduce the risk of heart disease. To give this possible benefit, it adds, the olive oil must replace a similar amount of saturated fat in your diet -- and must not increase the total calories you eat in a day.
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