As evidence continues to mount affirming that inflammatory substances in the blood promote plaque growth, plaque rupture, and clot formation, all of which likely increase the risk of heart attacks, “we’ve got to start asking ourselves: ‘Is any fat, even so-called good fats, beneficial in terms of preventing heart attacks and strokes?'” says Kimberly Gomer, MS, RD, Director of Nutrition at the Pritikin Longevity Center.
The Mediterranean diet has received much attention as a healthy way to eat, and with good reason. The Mediterranean diet has been shown to reduce risk of heart disease, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, certain cancers, depression, and in older adults, a decreased risk of frailty, along with better mental and physical function. In January, US News and World Report named it the “best diet overall” for the second year running.

If you've been cooking with vegetable oil or coconut oil, make the switch to extra-virgin olive oil. Olive oil is rich in monounsaturated fatty acids which may improve HDL cholesterol, the "good" type of cholesterol. HDL cholesterol ferries "bad" LDL particles out of arteries, according to a 2017 study in Circulation. Use olive oil in homemade salad dressings and vinaigrettes. Drizzle it on finished dishes like fish or chicken to boost flavor. Swap butter for olive oil in mashed potatoes, pasta, and more.
"Even though it's called the Mediterranean diet, it's not really a diet," said Atlanta registered dietitian Rahaf Al Bochi, a spokeswoman for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. "It doesn't tell you what to eat and not eat. It's a lifestyle that encourages consuming all food groups but gives more weight to those which have the most health benefits."

All olive oils are not the same, however. This book also explores the effects of diverse varieties of olives, growing techniques and oil-production methods on the health-giving properties - and flavour - of different oils. With over 100 delicious recipes, it points the way to those extra virgin oils and food combinations that are likely to do you the most good.

Dr. Fung suggests not doing the same fasting routine, day after day, but to “switch it up”; 16:8 one day, 24 hours IF the next, then a day of regular eating. That is because the body has a strong physiological drive to seek homeostasis — energy balance. “Whenever the body is exposed to a constant stimulus, it will become acclimated to it,” he says.

We will then act out our ancestral programming by eating the most calorie dense foods (i.e., pizza, french fries, cookies, cakes, etc.) and eating much more of those foods then what our body needs to energize itself until the next meal. This results in a vicious cycle of overeating and weight gain with the subconscious intention to prepare us for famine — famine that never comes.
People if you stick to what he says you will lose the weight. The first 1.5 weeks are tough. The rest are a lot easier. You get an energy high after the 3rd week. Never have I had so much energy. I am down 27lbs in 7 weeks. I only workout 3 times a week and its only 45 minutes. This whole write-up he did is very thorough and encouraging. I am sure he has help hundreds of people.

I would love to see some before and after pics… High intensity biking/running or any cardio for long periods of time can raise your cortisol levels, spiking your insulin whilst putting you in a catabolic state… Your body is eating away at your muscles by converting dietary protein into glucose. The physical stress from extreme cardio sends “stress signals” throughout your body forcing it to look for additional energy. Your hormonal systems interpret this energy as glucose. It’s like when you watch the Olympics, long distance runners look skinny and sick whilst “short distance sprinters” look thick and muscular… HIIT training or moderate cardio is the way to go if you want to spare muscle mass…
Ten years ago an ambitious and unique research trial was started in Spain in 7,500 mildly overweight men and women in their 60s at risk of heart disease and diabetes. They were randomly allocated to two diets for five years: one a low-fat diet recommended by doctors in most western countries and the other a high fat Mediterranean diet supplemented with either extra olive oil or nuts.
Sleep enough – for most people at least seven hours per night on average – and keep stress under control. Sleep deprivation and stress hormones raise blood sugar levels, slowing ketosis and weight loss a bit. Plus they might make it harder to stick to a keto diet, and resist temptations. So while handling sleep and stress will not get you into ketosis on it’s own, it’s still worth thinking about.
Samantha described how she was eating low-carb, high-fat, exercising five times a week, snacking rarely on nuts or cheese, drinking about three to five glasses of alcohol a week (dry red or white wine, prosecco or vodka soda) and drinking bulletproof coffee in the morning. She had been tested for thyroid issues and was fine. What advice could we give her?
Flynn proved the success of a diet that’s high in healthy fats in 2010 with a study of 44 women over 50 who’d become overweight during breast cancer treatment. Each woman trialled two eight-week diets: Flynn’s olive oil-based diet and a low-fat food plan as recommended by the US National Cancer Institute. Both diets were made up of 1500 calories a day.
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