For Brown University researcher and Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine Dr. Mary Flynn, the development and advocacy of a plant-based, olive oil diet was at one time considered outrageous. In the 1990s when the notion of consuming low-fat and fat-free foods for health was gaining widespread popularity, Flynn, who is also a nutritionist at The Miriam Hospital, was a vocal dissident. She openly expressed her concerns that this eating pattern was largely unsupported by sound science, even though many others in her field opposed her views. “I know that people in the nutrition community thought I was a near heretic,” Flynn says.
Is pasta good or bad for you? Pasta is a staple food in many diets. It is quick, inexpensive, and filling. However, some types of pasta may be unhealthful and add too many calories to a person's diet without providing much nutrition. In this article, learn which types of pasta are good for you, as well as how to create a healthful pasta-based meal. Read now
Add in intermittent fasting: Once you are fat-adapted, hunger pangs diminish and it is easy to go for longer periods without eating. Many people naturally stop eating breakfast — they just aren’t hungry when they wake up. The number one rule of low-carb eating is “eat when you are hungry and stop when you are full.” So if you are not hungry try fasting for 16 hours, and then eating just lunch and dinner in an 8-hour window, called a 16:8 fast. Or try eating dinner one night, than fasting until dinner the next night, doing a 24-hours fast.
It requires a pit stop in the liver rather than getting immediately converted into energy like the other MCTs above. This is why it is more accurately described as an LCT, not an MCT like marketers claim. It raises cholesterol more than any other fatty acid (not necessarily a bad thing.) It is also commonly cited as having antimicrobial benefits, which it does…except the shorter chain MCTs are more effective against aggressive candida yeast and even gonorrhea and chlamydia (as a monoglyceride).[3][4]
Designed for athletes looking for a fast burst of energy, those following a paleo or keto diet and everyone looking to support brain health,† Dr. Formulated MCT Coconut Oil is 100% organic coconut oil and delivers 13g of MCTs—including Caprylic and Capric acids—per serving. MCTs are healthy fatty acids that are easily digested, provide energy and are burned by the body for fuel and energy.†
“The general body of research says that once you have two or more tablespoons a day, you’ll improve your blood pressure, your glucose levels and your good cholesterol,” Flynn says. “But I’ve found that the weight-loss effect comes into play at three tablespoons, so that’s what I recommend. It’s an amazing food – it does all these things that help your body, plus it tastes good.”
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