Samantha described how she was eating low-carb, high-fat, exercising five times a week, snacking rarely on nuts or cheese, drinking about three to five glasses of alcohol a week (dry red or white wine, prosecco or vodka soda) and drinking bulletproof coffee in the morning. She had been tested for thyroid issues and was fine. What advice could we give her?
I can't help but think that if all of the world's leaders were to read this book and promote the implementation of its recommendations, we would see a lot less premature death and morbidity. Our population would shrink in girth. Diabetes and hypertension would be relegated to the genetically less fortunate...―Dr Melissa Shirley Walton MD, Cardiologist, Medscape
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Fortunately, Drs. Kevin Hall and Juen Guo had the same burning question. In 2017, they analyzed the data and published a meta-analysis of controlled feeding studies that compared diets of equal calorie and protein content with variations in carbohydrate and fat content. [24] By filtering out the diet data in this way, the researchers could finally find out whether restricting carbs or limiting calories is more important when it comes to weight loss.
Finally, watch your protein intake, it’s very easy to go over on that and excess protein will be converted to sugars in your body (so it’s fine if you work out a lot but if you don’t then just be aware and don’t go overboard). It’s practically impossible to eat too much good fats (avoid trans fats like the plague and try to limit polyunsaturated too as too much of them can promote inflammation in the body and unfortunately they’re in lots of stuff), fats are so satieting though that you’ll nearly always feel way too full before you can eat too much of them (provided the food that they’re in isn’t secretly hiding carbs and protein too, I.e. be careful with the kind of nuts you eat, macadamia only have 5 grams of carbs per 100g but cashews have 20+ so a couple big handfuls of those will nearly knock you out of ketosis like that!)
Sources: Marco Petrini, President of Monini North America, Inc., Olive Oil from Spain, Cat Cora chef and TV personality, founder of Cat Cora’s Kitchen by Gaea, Kaldi Olive Oil, Euphoria Greek Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Fran Gage author and olive oil expert, Theo Stephan founder of Global Gardens and author of Olive Oil and Vinegar for Life, Monell Chemical Senses Center, Olive Oil Times, Rip  Esselstyn, author of The Engine 2 Diet. Inspired by “The Island Where People Forget to Die” in the New York Times Magazine.
"I enjoy what I do on a daily basis with Instagram and the interactions I have within the keto community. The relationships extend beyond keto. I started an Instagram account to keep himself accountable and have since made countless friendships with people all over the world. I receive frequent messages from people saying thank you and it motivates me to stay involved."
The benefits can’t be narrowed down to one single food or factor but to some general themes. Extra fibre, a diverse range of fruits and vegetables, whole grains and legumes, yoghurts and cheese, small amounts of fish and meat, red wine, nuts and seeds and good quality olive oil all played their part. However the authors believe that the olive oil itself was the most powerful single factor.

Results, she promises, can be quite dramatic. And sure enough, Woman’s World readers who tested Palinski-Wade’s olive oil diet menus melted up to eight pounds and four inches of ab flab in just seven days. “I tried Weight Watchers, supplements, fad diets, but nothing worked until this,” says Pennsylvania grandmother Eleanor Downing, 62. “I lost a pant size in a week!” Meanwhile, Colorado travel agent Erika Crocker, 47, who whisked four inches off her middle, still can’t believe such a simple approach could be so effective. As for 30-year-old Mississippi mom Lindsey Bradley, 30, dropping a size has her raving: “For once, my belly got flatter without hunger pangs.”
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