Over the last few months, we have interviewed five people who have used the keto diet to each lose over 100 pounds. They shared with us the different kinds of life changing habits they developed along their keto journeys - the habits that kept the weight off. How do they deal with cravings? What was the hardest part? When did they decide to make a change? What do they eat every day? Listen to the interviews over at the Keto For Normies Podcast or stay and read them here! 
Sleep is good – cpap makes sure of that 🙂 Health issues are arthritis, high LDL ( think that will go away once I loose lots of weight, family history though). I try to track nutrients and I know I need to do better but I am pretty sure I am getting enough fats and calories but the pen and paper will tell for sure. This morning I am making a egg,spinach, mushroom, cheese & bacon in a large cupcake holder so I know how much I put in each. Stress….. I am a nurse, some of my high need patients are really tugging on my emotions and dealing with the ones who want their “pain meds” grrrr but overall I work for a great Dr in a great office so I am lucky, home life is great, could use some more money – lol who couldn’t – but have an ex who I guess I still have some pstd (20 yrs is hard) but still working on it – my last son is a senior in high school so won’t have to deal with the ex too much longer.

Metagenics offers a wide range of educational opportunities including webinars, group meetings, and seminars as part of our commitment to continuing functional medicine education. Our goal is to give our practitioners further insight to help address their patients’ unique health needs for a higher level of personalized, lifetime wellness care. We have been sharing this ever-growing body of nutritional and lifestyle research for over 25 years.
Emerging evidence suggests that eating this way may offer protective effects for those with and at risk for type 2 diabetes. For one, Mediterranean eating improves blood sugar control in those already diagnosed with the condition, suggesting it can be a good way to manage the disease. What’s more, given those with diabetes are at increased odds for cardiovascular disease, adopting this diet can help improve their heart health, according to a paper published in April 2014 in the journal Nutrients. (4)
The point here is that olive oil is not the magic bullet that made populations along the Mediterranean in the 1950s so healthy. Olive oil was simply a bellweather, or marker, for other features of the Mediterranean diet, like plenty of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and exercise, that actually did make Mediterranean populations healthier than those in the U.S. or Northern Europe, where more fatty animal products were consumed.
When it comes to eating a healthy diet, olive oil is your best friend. It tastes delicious, it's full of healthy, good-for-your-heart fats, and it might even help fight off dangerous belly bugs. But there’s another way this golden health elixir can make your life better—and you don't even need to eat it. Simply smelling olive oil may help you lose weight, according to a recent study in the American Journal of Nutrition.

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Picking through the data, the researchers found that the extra olive oil group did slightly better than the extra nut group, but both were clearly superior to low fat diets. The research was also much more reliable than many diet studies because it was a randomised control trial that looked at a large group of people over a long period of time, rather than just monitoring people on one diet for a few days or weeks.
SOURCES: Environmental Nutrition, June 2003; May 2004; February 2005. The Journal of Pediatrics, July 1995. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, February 1997. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, July 1997. Journal of the American Medical Association, 2004; 292. Food Chemistry, May 2004, vol 85; issue 3. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition January 2005. FDA News, Nov. 1, 2004. The Olive Oil Source web site.
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