The 2017 meta-analysis by Drs. Kevin Hall and Juen Guo provide us with very convincing data, but we must also consider the fact that the data came from studies where all the food was provided by the scientists. Although this is a great way to assess the difference between low-carb and high-carb diet, this does not simulate the real-world effectiveness of each diet. For this reason, we must investigate data from less strict studies. In other words, we need to look at what happened when subjects were told to follow a specific diet on their own.

Type 2 diabetes is a long-term metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood sugar, insulin resistance, and relative lack of insulin. Insulin resistance is when the body is no longer able to secrete insulin naturally in response to blood sugar increases, and hence blood sugar remains high. This is typically a dysfunction with the insulin receptors, and with changes in diet, including lower levels of sugar and carbohydrates, it can be controlled or reversed.


I just started keto this past week and I am on day 7. I am down 4lbs, but have a long way to go to reach my goal (40lbs). I was wondering about certain foods….are tomatoes/onions okay on a keto diet? I’ve read quite a few conflicting reports that claim you should not eat those while on keto. I’m not very good at tracking macros and calories yet. I’m just trying to stay focused on eating all the right foods. It has been a rough week with brain fog, headaches, fatigue, the works…and barely enough energy to get in any exercise. Still I try. I have two little ones and that tends to take up more of my time. I recently found out that milk is pretty high in carbs and replaced that as well. I was wondering if after your reaching your goal, whether or not I could transition to paleo and still keep the weight off. Do you think that would work? I love fruits and the occassional glass of milk that allows me to make a smoothie haha….I was just wondering, what are your thoughts on this?
Dr. Wendy Kohrt, of the University of Colorado Denver, leads its IMAGE program (Investigation into Metabolism, Age, Gender and Exercise) and has been studying the impacts of menopause for more than 20 years. She has found that during menopause women’s metabolisms slow by about 50 calories a day and that women experience more food cravings, less movement and more muscle loss, which together create a quadruple whammy for gradual weight gain over time. Kohrt notes, however, that menopause itself has been vastly under-researched over the years, a point shared by other commentators, considering the impact it has on the health and wellness of millions of women.
Perhaps one of the biggest reasons that MCT oil sales have skyrocketed in recent years is due to growing popularity of “The Bullet Proof Diet.” “The Bulletproof Diet,” written by Dave Asprey, is a dietary approach for rapid weight loss and better cognitive health that recommends you receive 50 percent to 70 percent of your energy from healthy fats, especially MCT oil, grass-fed butter and coconut oil. (1) The plan’s signature breakfast, “bulletproof coffee” — a mix of coffee, MCT oil and butter — promises decreases in hunger levels, the ability to fast easily, better brain function and mental clarity. While coconut oil benefits are still recognized by Bulletproof dieters, MCT oil is considered the gold standard, and the official Bulletproof site sells its own MCT oil, called Brain Octane Oil.
SOURCES: Environmental Nutrition, June 2003; May 2004; February 2005. The Journal of Pediatrics, July 1995. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, February 1997. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, July 1997. Journal of the American Medical Association, 2004; 292. Food Chemistry, May 2004, vol 85; issue 3. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition January 2005. FDA News, Nov. 1, 2004. The Olive Oil Source web site.
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