From this foundation, Flynn’s plant-based olive oil (PBOO) diet was born. She determined its components based on validated research examining food and chronic diseases. The cornerstone foods of the diet are extra virgin olive oil, vegetables (with particular emphasis on those with deep color and those from the cruciferous family), and starches/grains (ideally those that are whole), with minimal animal protein. Flynn was initially curious as to whether or not her diet would aid in weight loss. She hypothesized that as long as calories were controlled (~1500 calories per day for women, ~1800-2000 calorie per day for men), having healthy fats at every meal, in the form of nuts at breakfast and extra virgin olive oil at lunch and dinner, along with vegetable-heavy lunches and dinners, would help individuals feel more satiated and help them lose weight. Overall, those who follow her diet eat four to five servings of fat daily, most of which is extra virgin olive oil.
Keep in mind, too, that all oils are a mixture of saturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated acids (though they’re usually called by the name of the fatty acid that is most abundant). Olive oil is about 14% saturated fat, so if you’re pouring olive oil into your skillets and food every day, you’re likely consuming significantly more artery-clogging saturated fat than you realized.

Welcome to Keto! I cannot say enough good things about it! Your starting macros really depend on a few factors: current weight, height, approximate body fat, activity level, age, and gender. Its also important to figure out your BMR and daily calorie allotment. Each person is different; there is no way I could eat 150 grams of fat and get in a good amount of protein while remaining under my calorie limit for the day (1300). It is recommended that you re-calculate these numbers if your activity level or weight changes. Every 15 lbs I lose I take a look at my Macros. Here is the calculator my keto community and I use: https://keto-calculator.ankerl.com/
According to the American Heart Association, the Mediterranean diet is higher in fat than the standard American diet, yet lower in saturated fat. It’s usually roughly a ratio of 40 percent complex carbohydrates, 30 percent to 40 percent healthy fats and 20 percent to 30 percent quality protein foods. Because this balance is somewhat ideal in terms of keeping weight gain and hunger under control, it’s a good way for the body to remain in hormonal homeostasis, so someone’s insulin levels are normalized. As a byproduct, it also means someone’s mood is more likely to stay positive and relaxed, energy levels up, and physical activity easier.
Here are some known to be killed by medium-chain fats: streptococcus (which causes strep throat, pneumonia and sinus infections), straphylococcus (which causes food poisoning and urinary tract infections), neisseria (which causes meningitis, gonorrhea and pelvic inflammatory diseases), and some other strains that cause stomach viruses, candida, ulcers and sexually transmitted diseases. (9)
Because this is an eating pattern – not a structured diet – you're on your own to figure out how many calories you should eat to lose or maintain your weight, what you'll do to stay active and how you'll shape your Mediterranean menu. The Mediterranean diet pyramid should help get you started. The pyramid emphasizes eating fruits, veggies, whole grains, beans, nuts, legumes, olive oil, and flavorful herbs and spices; fish and seafood at least a couple of times a week; and poultry, eggs, cheese and yogurt in moderation, while saving sweets and red meat for special occasions. Top it off with a splash of red wine (if you want), remember to stay physically active and you're set.
Dr. Westman never brings up exercise as a first step in weight loss. He wants patients to focus on the diet first. “But later on, if things are no longer working well and there is still significant weight to lose, I bring up the E-word, exercise. But I try to get them back to things that are fun for them. Exercise will help you get through a plateau.”
The problem and the struggle for all the people we see, not just menopausal women, is they don’t know what hunger and fullness really are. They come to us after years and decades of a low fat high carb diet. So they are used to a feeling of fullness that is fuller than full. So we need to retrain ourselves to understand that full enough is the way you should feel.

Olive oil is an integral part of the "Mediterranean diet" which is associated with sensible tasty portions and slower, more enjoyable eating. People who eat a "Mediterranean diet" have been shown to have a remarkable variety of health benefits. The olive oil in the Mediterranean diet can quickly satisfy hunger and lead to fewer total calories ingested at mealtime. It is unclear if any single component of this diet is responsible for these health benefits or if it is a combination of olive oil and a diet high in vegetables, fruit and fish.


I felt nauseous and dizzy. My attempted one week of following the intensive olive oil diet was not going well. It was eight in the morning and on an empty stomach I had only finished half of the small glass of golden liquid specially chosen by my Spanish friends as the smoothest Albequina variety of extra virgin olive oil. Dipping crusty warm bread into it before an evening meal is one thing. Drinking it neat in the morning was another.
I weigh approx. 200 lbs 5’10” tall woman. I would have 3 eggs and 1 tbls butter for breakfast, than for lunch a shake: spinach, flax seeds, chia seeds, 1 tbls coconut oil, avocado, lemon. Snack: a keto bar http://www.ketobars.com/ and dinner: some green veggies with a salmon or steak. I use myfitnesspal for calorie counting and set my daily calorie goals at 1200, with 85% fat, 10% protein and 5% carbs. Out of that I would have 81g of fat, 36g protein and 22g carbs. Does that look like a good plan for keto diet? I would appreciate your help on this. Thank you in advance!

Hi julius, my name is gabby, in. High school i was 5’0 125-128 but was solid. Was a cheerleader/gymnast, i also was a thrower on track & had always lifted weights, fastforward early 20s i became a long distance runner which i found to be theraputic. I was the skinniest i had ever been, i then became pregnant had my son by emergecy c-section… I nursed & was extremely thin everywhere but where it mattered, once nursing stopped my weight ballooned& everything ive ever known of dieting & working out has not helped me. I work overnights so im concerned about the sleep aspect as i dont get much during my 5 night work week & 2kids.. HELP! Ideally id love to lose 30lbs… Not afraid of diet or excercise! Guidance please!! Sorry for the novel!


Finally, watch your protein intake, it’s very easy to go over on that and excess protein will be converted to sugars in your body (so it’s fine if you work out a lot but if you don’t then just be aware and don’t go overboard). It’s practically impossible to eat too much good fats (avoid trans fats like the plague and try to limit polyunsaturated too as too much of them can promote inflammation in the body and unfortunately they’re in lots of stuff), fats are so satieting though that you’ll nearly always feel way too full before you can eat too much of them (provided the food that they’re in isn’t secretly hiding carbs and protein too, I.e. be careful with the kind of nuts you eat, macadamia only have 5 grams of carbs per 100g but cashews have 20+ so a couple big handfuls of those will nearly knock you out of ketosis like that!)
Flynn says the key to the success of the olive oil diet is to cook your vegetables in olive oil. There are two main reasons for this. The first is that carotenoids – the powerful antioxidants that give orange, yellow and red veg their colour and are also found in abundance in leafy greens – need fat to be absorbed. She also believes the nutrients in cruciferous veg such as broccoli and cabbage are better absorbed with oil, but that’s still yet to be conclusively proven.
×