And monounsaturated fat isn't the only thing olive oil has going for it nutritionally. Some olive oils come with phytonutrients that may offer their own disease protection benefits (still, it's not clear whether most of us can take in enough of these phytonutrients without going overboard on olive oil, says Joyce Nettleton, DSc, RD, researcher and editor of the PUFA Newsletter).
Day 7: Peak exhaustion set in back on days 3 and 4, but I rounded the corner and started to feel more like myself the last couple days. Now at the halfway mark, I feel like I've gotten this keto meal-planning thing down-even if the food isn't everything I hoped and dreamed. (More on that below). Plus I'm able to effectively train the way I'm used to. Over the weekend I hit the barre, the bike, and the (kettle)bells, and it feels great. I have my energy back and then some. And I simultaneously feel lighter (down another pound) and stronger.

In fact, the FDA now allows olive oil labels to carry the claim that its monounsaturated fat can reduce heart disease risks -- with a few strings attached. The claim says that "limited and not conclusive scientific evidence" suggests that eating about 2 tablespoons of olive oil daily may reduce the risk of heart disease. To give this possible benefit, it adds, the olive oil must replace a similar amount of saturated fat in your diet -- and must not increase the total calories you eat in a day.
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