Fanatic? Someone with T2D, a disease usually claimed to be progressive and a never ending stream of problems and medications, was REVERSED. That’s something to shout from the rooftops. The drop in medication use alone, but the big pharma companies would prefer that people’s stories of reversing (well, putting it into remission) T2D get called fanatical instead of insightful.
Dr. Campos, it is unfortunate that you retain the medical community’s negative stance on the ketogenic diet, probably picked up in medical school when you studied ketoacidosis, in the midst of an obesity and type II diabetes epidemic that is growing every year, especially among populations who will never see the Harvard Health Letter. The medical community has failed in reversing this trend, especially among children, and the public is picking up the tab, in the form of higher health insurance premiums to treat chronic metabolic diseases which doctors cannot cure. The ketogenic diet does not bid its adherents to eat unhealthy processed meats, and the green leafy vegetables that it emphasizes are important in a number of nutritional deficiencies. People lose weight on the ketogenic diet, they lose their craving for sugar, they feel more satiety, they may become less depressed, their insulin receptors sensitivity is improved, and these are all the good outcomes you fail to mention. There is a growing body of research which demonstrates the neuroprotective effects of the ketogenic diet to slow cancer progression, as well as diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s, for which there are no effective medical treatments. Please respect your patients by providing them with evidence-based medical outcomes, not opinions.
Gastric bypass surgery, the most common of which is the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedure, results in a portion of the stomach being stapled to reduce appetite and food intake. A small stomach pouch is formed, but no portion of the stomach is removed surgically. The top section of the stomach (called the pouch - about the size of an egg or a walnut) is where food is digested. It holds only about one ounce of food.
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People use a ketogenic diet most often to lose weight, but it can help manage certain medical conditions, like epilepsy, too. It also may help people with heart disease, certain brain diseases, and even acne, but there needs to be more research in those areas. Talk with your doctor first to find out if it’s safe for you to try a ketogenic diet, especially if you have type 1 diabetes.
Samantha reportedly first tried a few quick-fix diet pills to help her lose weight that summer, but after getting unsatisfactory results, she decided to overhaul her diet and drastically cut out all the cookies and fast food she had been eating last August. But Samantha says she still wasn't shedding a lot of weight until she replaced her five cups of sugary tea for unsweetened green tea.

Onakpoya, I., Posadzki, P., & Ernst, E. (2014, February 17). The efficacy of glucomannan supplementation in overweight and obesity: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials. [Abstract]. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 33(1), 70–78. Retrieved from http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/07315724.2014.870013

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